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Friday, October 5
 

8:00am

Registration
Friday October 5, 2018 8:00am - 4:30pm
MRDC 801 North Ave NW (at Georgia Tech) Atlanta, GA 30332

9:00am

Drone Primer
Limited Capacity filling up

Learn about drone use cases, the technology, as well as practice and policy.  This class will help you get started on your path to commercial drone certification and open the doors to world of possibilities.  

Drones are one of the most important new technologies to come along in a generation.  Low cost systems with advanced flight controls have made have made it possible for someone with little experience to successfully operate these aircrafts.  Innovating in the skies was once territory reserved for deep pocketed corporations but access to this technology is changing all of that.  Scientists, entrepreneurs, photographers, film makers, surveyors, and public safety officers all have an amazing new toolset to change their industry and open new opportunities.  But first, they need to understand how this technology can work for them and how to navigate various drone regulatory bodies.  

 In this class we will discuss the various possibilities drones offer and show case examples of how these systems might help you.  We will discuss policies surrounding drone flight both nationally and locally as well as how to begin the path toward your commercial operators license (Part 107).  

Speakers
DP

Daniel Parker

Director of Industrial Services, Atlanta Drone Group
Daniel Parker is currently the Director of Industrial Services at the Atlanta Drone Group. With significant experience building and testing UAS since 2012, Dan has directed UAS operations for multiple organizations and is currently an alpha-tester for DJI. Dan has a wealth of knowledge... Read More →


Friday October 5, 2018 9:00am - 12:00pm
GTMI Auditorium

9:00am

Introduction to Grasshopper
Limited Capacity seats available

This course is for design professionals who are looking to efficiently learn concepts and features of Grasshopper at an accelerated pace in an instructor-led  environment.

Instructor Andres Gonzalez will get you started with generative modeling in Rhino using the Grasshopper add-on. The advantages of using Grasshopper in preliminary design and concept development come to life in numerous real-life examples. Note, Andres will be using Rhino 6 for Windows, which includes Grasshopper.

You will need the following software tools:

Speakers
AG

Andres Gonzalez

McNeel
Andrés is a software trainer and developer since the 1980s. He has developed applications for diverse design markets as well as training materials for different CAD and Design software including the community of training materials www.rhino3d.tvAndrés has been working with the... Read More →


Friday October 5, 2018 9:00am - 4:00pm
Love Bldg #109

9:00am

Rhino for Educators workshop
Limited Capacity seats available

Learn how you can add 3-D modeling to your design and design communication curriculum without burdening your students with yet another difficult software product. You'll be able to focus on teaching design while your students take advantage of the latest 3D modeling technology.

Using Rhino, you will be guided through a series of hands-on exercises that highlight 3D modeling concepts. You will also learn how Rhino is used to render models for visualization, manufacturing and prototyping.

Bring your jump drive and laptop. Classroom activities, models, training materials, and files will be made available to you for use in your classroom. You will have students working in 3D on your design exercise within the first week of the term.

More Information...

Speakers
avatar for Mary Ann Fugier

Mary Ann Fugier

Director of Education & Training, Robert McNeel and Associates
Rhinoceros, Grasshopper, Teaching Rhino, Export from Rhino for 3D Printing
avatar for Dale Fugier

Dale Fugier

Senior Software Engineer, Robert McNeel & Associates
Dale Fugier is a Senior Software Engineer and a 28 year veteran with Robert McNeel & Associates. The technologies that Dale works on include core Rhino, the Rhino SDK, RhinoCommon, Rhino.Python, RhinoScript, the Zoo, and much more.


Friday October 5, 2018 9:00am - 4:00pm
Love Bldg #295

12:00pm

Sign up for a tour of Georgia Tech Makerspaces
Student led tours start at the beginning of each hour. There are three tour stops:
  1. Invention studio
  2. MILL - Materials Innovation and Learning Laboratory
  3. ECE Makerspace - Interdisciplinary Design Commons Each tour stop will take approximately 40 minutes and the commute across each stop is around 10 minutes.  Please do not sign up for different locations at the same time slot.

Please use this link to sign up for a spot!


Friday October 5, 2018 12:00pm - 4:00pm
The Invention Studio 801 Ferst Dr, Atlanta, GA 30332

1:00pm

Fusion 360 (Sheet Metal/Fusion Animation/Fusion Simulation—with FDM materials)
Limited Capacity filling up

Please join me for a workshop on Fusion360.  As an Industrial Designer and Educator working for Autodesk, I have found the sweet spot between Design and Engineering.  Come explore tactics on using Simulation tools as a sounds foundation for exploration and concepts.  In addition, we will explore a little sheet metal and animation tools to help tell a product or concept story.  Time permitting, we will do a little sculpting as well.

Speakers
avatar for Jeff Smith

Jeff Smith

Autodesk
Jeff Smith, IDSA, is an industrial designer currently working for Autodesk as an Education Manager.  With a diverse background in product design and development, Smith brings this experience to a team that supports Fusion360 in higher education within the United States. Prior to... Read More →


Friday October 5, 2018 1:00pm - 4:00pm
MRDC #4211

1:00pm

Tinkercad your garden: How to design around an existing object
Limited Capacity filling up

Tinkercad’s John Helfen will lead a workshop that explores how to design around an existing object. John will use the model of a vertical garden to show strategies about measuring and mocking up objects, assessing points of contact, and connecting objects to each other. He will illustrate iterating on design decisions, researching and reading data sheets, and documenting your project progression. Finally, he will show some techniques to simplify the process of complex designs. Join John as he demonstrates these techniques and shows how Tinkercad and 3D printing can help create a sustainable, environmentally friendly and clean way to grow food at home and in small spaces.

Speakers
avatar for John Helfen

John Helfen

Technical Product Manager - Tinkercad Platform at Autodesk, Autodesk
By day I am Product Manager for both Tinkercad and Fusion. I have been with Autodesk for nearly 20 years in roles ranging from Product Support to Product Management focused on Manufacturing, Architecture, and Education. By night I am a maker, builder, teacher, husband, and parent... Read More →


Friday October 5, 2018 1:00pm - 4:00pm
Love Bldg #210

2:30pm

BlocksCAD: Teaching STEAM and Coding
Limited Capacity seats available

Would you like to help your math students develop a deeper understanding of math and coding concepts? Join Jonah Boucher as he explores how you can easily incorporate computational thinking and coding in the context of a math curriculum. He will show how to utilize a block-based programming tool that students can use to code and create 3D models and designs that are printable on any 3D-printer or viewable in any AR/VR space. In addition, Jonah will explain how this supplemental math software helps students develop a computational mindset - the ability to think abstractly, recursively, algorithmically, and logically - while addressing CSTA standards in an engaging manner. Best of all, you will discover that teaching coding in the context of math helps students develop a deeper understanding of both!

Website: blockscad3d.com

BlocksCAD Video: https://youtu.be/DyifdRbUoXQ 


Speakers
avatar for Jonah Boucher

Jonah Boucher

Jonah studied mathematics and environmental studies at Hamilton College before working in high school STEM education in Chicago. His focus with BlocksCAD is on integrating coding and design into math curriculum.


Friday October 5, 2018 2:30pm - 4:00pm
Love Bldg #295

4:00pm

Hands on Workshop - Live training with 3DPrinterOS
Join Aaron and Oscar from the 3DPrinterOS team for a live training on how to share 3d printers with multiple students. In this session, attendees can expect to learn how to set up 3DPrinterOS, add their first printer, and share printers with students. An overview of different types of data reporting will also be provided. We encourage attendees to bring their own computer if they would like to participate in the workshop.


Speakers
avatar for Rene-Oscar Ariko

Rene-Oscar Ariko

VP of Global Sales, 3DPrinterOS
Rene-Oscar Ariko is the VP of Sales at 3DPrinterOS. He's helped deploy hundreds of printers for thousands of students at leading universities such as Harvard, Georgia Tech, CalTech, Duke and Lehigh University.
avatar for Aaron Roy

Aaron Roy

COO, 3DPrinterOS
Aaron Roy is one of the leading innovators in educational 3D printing software. He is the co-founder and COO of 3DPrinterOS, the world's first cloud management platform for users, files and 3D printers. His contributions are part of the "3D Printing Revolution" class on Coursera and... Read More →


Friday October 5, 2018 4:00pm - 5:00pm
MRDC #4211

5:00pm

Registration at GTMI
Friday October 5, 2018 5:00pm - 8:00pm
GTMI 813 Ferst Drive, N.W., Atlanta, GA 30332-0560

6:30pm

Friday Kickoff Event
Speakers
avatar for George Hart

George Hart

Professor, Stony Brook University
George Hart is a sculptor and applied mathematician who demonstrates how mathematics is cool and creative in ways you might not have expected. Whether he is slicing a bagel into two linked halves or leading hundreds of participants in an intricate geometric sculpture barn raising... Read More →


Friday October 5, 2018 6:30pm - 8:30pm
GTMI Auditorium
 
Saturday, October 6
 

7:00am

Breakfast
Saturday October 6, 2018 7:00am - 8:15am
Georgia Tech Hotel 800 Spring St NW, Atlanta, GA 30308

7:00am

Registration at Georgia Tech Hotel
Saturday October 6, 2018 7:00am - 7:00pm
Georgia Tech Hotel 800 Spring St NW, Atlanta, GA 30308

8:00am

Opening Remarks
Saturday October 6, 2018 8:00am - 8:30am
Grand Ballroom

8:30am

Saturday Morning Keynote
Speakers
avatar for Jesse Louis-Rosenberg

Jesse Louis-Rosenberg

co-founder/chief science officer, Nervous System
avatar for Jessica Rosenkrantz

Jessica Rosenkrantz

co-founder/creative director, Nervous System



Saturday October 6, 2018 8:30am - 9:30am
Salon I, II, III

9:30am

Saturday Morning Coffee
Saturday October 6, 2018 9:30am - 10:00am
Georgia Tech Hotel 800 Spring St NW, Atlanta, GA 30308

10:00am

Using Design Thinking to Create the Doctor of the Future
Dr. Ku (@bonkuwill present Using Design Thinking to Create the Doctor of the Future, featuring pioneering work accomplished by medical students at JeffDesign to successfully introduce desktop 3D printing into the Jefferson health care system in Philadelphia. He will also illustrate recent entrepreneurial success of student teams participating in JeffSolves, who with the mentoring of boutique product development firm 10xBeta, leverage their clinical expertise to serve needs overlooked by the major medical device developers, to launch unique products targeting better health care outcomes.

Speakers
avatar for Bon Ku

Bon Ku

Assistant Dean for Health and Design and an Associate Professor, Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University
Bon Ku, MD, MPP is the Assistant Dean for Health and Design and an Associate Professor at the Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University. He is a practicing emergency medicine physician and the founder/director of the first design thinking program in a medical school... Read More →


Saturday October 6, 2018 10:00am - 10:40am
Salon III
  • about Bon Ku, MD, MPP is the Assistant Dean for Health and Design and an Associate Professor at the Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University. He is a practicing emergency medicine physician and the founder/director of the first design thinking program in a medical school. His innovative program that teaches future physicians to apply human-centered design to healthcare challenges has been highlighted in the The New York Times, New England Journal of Medicine Catalyst, The Huffington Post, Next City and Architectural Digest. Dr. Ku has spoken widely on the intersection of health and design thinking (TEDx, South by Southwest, Mayo Clinic Transform, Stanford Medicine X)  and serves on the Design and Health Leadership Group at the American Institute of Architects. He received the Health Care Innovators Award from the Philadelphia Business Journal and made the Best of Philly list in Philadelphia Magazine. Dr. Ku holds a master’s degree in Public Policy from Princeton University, MD from Penn State and a bachelor’s degree in Classical Studies from the University of Pennsylvania

10:00am

Visualizing Mathematics with 3D Printing
I'll talk about two topics. First, I'll talk about some problems and solutions, technologies and platforms involved in writing my popular mathematics book, "Visualizing Mathematics with 3D Printing". The book uses 3D printed objects to explain accessible but very three-dimensional mathematical ideas. Second, I'll talk about the undergraduate mathematics course I teach, "Geometry and Algorithms in 3D Modeling". This is a "capstone", project based course, in which students gain practical experience with 3D design software and 3D printers. Based on mathematical and programming skills covered in the course, students design and 3D print mathematical visualizations and other objects.

Speakers
avatar for Henry Segerman

Henry Segerman

Assistant Professor, Department of Mathematics, Oklahoma State University
Henry Segerman received his masters in mathematics from the University of Oxford, and his Ph.D. in mathematics from Stanford University. He is currently an assistant professor in the department of mathematics at Oklahoma State University. His research interests are in three-dimensional... Read More →


Saturday October 6, 2018 10:00am - 10:40am
Conference Room A

10:00am

Choose Your Own Adventure: Learner Pathways in Higher Ed Makerspaces
UNC-Chapel Hill's BeAM network has makerspaces across campus that offer students, faculty, and staff access to a variety of digital fabrication tools, from laser cutting to 3D printing to machine embroidery. One challenge of having such a wide variety of users is supporting diverse learning pathways for all users while balancing the broad availability of makerspace resources. By continually experimenting with new approaches, BeAM has stayed nimble in addressing the needs of various users. In this talk, Anna Engelke, Program Coordinator for the BeAM network, and Glenn Walters, Director of the ESE Design Center, will share the process they use to design resources to support the users that visit the BeAM makerspaces. This includes the development and prototyping of tool trainings, design workshops, academic curricula, digital simulation games, learning communities, and online materials. They will also discuss partnerships between BeAM and other on-campus groups in developing these resources, such as collaborating with the School of Education to study makerspace learning environments. Session attendees are encouraged to participate in small-group discussion after a 20-25 minute presentation. Groups will share their experiences and observations as they relate to the presented learning resources and brainstorm how resources could be adapted to different contexts.

Speakers
avatar for Anna Engelke

Anna Engelke

BeAM Program Coordinator, UNC-Chapel Hill
Anna Engelke is the Program Coordinator for the BeAM (Be a Maker) network of makerspaces at UNC Chapel Hill. She works with students, faculty, and staff in developing educational programs and projects that integrate digital fabrication and design. She is also a graduate of the Masters... Read More →
avatar for Glenn Walters

Glenn Walters

Director of the ESE Design Center, BeAM at UNC Chapel Hill
Glenn Walters is the director of the ESE Design Center at UNC Chapel Hill, a design and fabrication facility that specializes in development of unique tools and instrumentation for research.  He is also a founding member of the UNC BeAM Makerspace Executive Committee and the senior... Read More →


Saturday October 6, 2018 10:00am - 10:40am
Conference Room Four

10:00am

Teaching 3D: Developing learning-by-doing experiences
The University of Florida Libraries has operated a 3D print service since 2014 for the UF community and the public. This service which is entirely staff-managed provides access to 3D printing but does not enable students to learn the actual process and technology behind 3D printing. We decided to expand our 3D service to include circulating 3D technology and coursework for hands-on use by undergraduate students. The library purchased a fleet of circulating 3D printers and developed a new credit course that teaches students how to build 3D printers. The circulating 3D printers are Printrbot Plays which leave the library in a wheeled Pelican case and with 250 grams of filament. This empowers the students to explore 3D printing in their own space and timeframe. The credit course is a small cohort of 12 students who are building iMade3D Jellybox kits in a weekly class held within the library. This hands-on course has presented learning opportunities in how we teach such courses and has sparked plans for new offerings. This presentation will discuss the benefits and challenges to offering these learning opportunities and our next steps as we focus on enabling students to discover and develop skills with emerging technologies.

Speakers
avatar for Jean Bossart

Jean Bossart

Other, University of Florida
As a liaison to the University of Florida's College of Engineering, Jean Bossart assists STEM faculty and students with research, data support, citation management, and integration of creative technologies, such as 3D printing, into the STEM discipline library services. Ms. Bossart... Read More →
avatar for Sara Gonzalez

Sara Gonzalez

Science Librarian, University of Florida
Sara Gonzalez is the Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Visualization Librarian at the Marston Science Library at the University of Florida. A former geophysicist, her research interests include emerging technologies in libraries, modeling and visualization of data, and scientific... Read More →


Saturday October 6, 2018 10:00am - 10:40am
Conference Room B

10:00am

Building to Code: 3D Printing and AP CS Principles with OpenSCAD
Building to Code: 3D Printing and AP CS Principles with OpenSCAD is an Engineering-focused workshop that delivers Computational Thinking skills in the context of 3D Design and 3D printing. OpenSCAD is a declarative programming language that allows users to generate complex 3D models with text-based instructions. This hands-on workshop will introduce participants to basic operators and control structures in OpenSCAD, provide a collection of teacher resources to support instruction in OpenSCAD, and discuss how the AP Computer Science Principles Curriculum Framework might be delivered with OpenSCAD and 3D printing.

AP Computer Science Principles with OpenSCAD and 3D Printing provides teachers a pathway to simultaneously deliver instruction in programming, engineering, and spatial reasoning. Schools everywhere are struggling to fit in all of this "new" STEM/Maker curriculum into their course offerings. This workshop suggests a way to teach coding in a context that actively targets the development of other skills and intelligences necessary for superior STEM achievement.

AP Computer Science Principles with OpenSCAD and 3D Printing is hands on workshop that is appropriate for all coding ability levels. Please install OpenSCAD prior to attending as participants will actively code 3d projects as part of the session.

Presentation Link: https://drive.google.com/open?id=1Eabf2OI0zVhnJoe-CdbWiYKTT1C1zZcSOPWFgQj3mk8

Speakers
avatar for Justin Gohde

Justin Gohde

Department Head, Computer Science, Trinity School, NYC
I'm Department Head of Computer Science at Trinity School in New York City. In my spare time I'm finishing up a Masters of Computer Science at Georgia Tech and working on extending my practice in the fine arts.


Saturday October 6, 2018 10:00am - 11:25am
Conference Room C

10:45am

Design for Additive Manufacturing Education: The Power of Informal Learning Experiences
The true power of Additive Manufacturing (AM) technologies lies in their layer-wise approach to fabrication, which provides unsurpassed design freedom in both the geometric topology and the material composition of a product. However, this potential is limited in part by designers’ lack of knowledge on how exactly to fully exploit the process capabilities. A lack of knowledge of how to design products specifically for AM (DfAM) is often viewed as a barrier to industrial adoption of the technologies. In a 2014 NSF Workshop on “Additive Manufacturing Education,” participants from industry, government, and academia stressed the need for integrating design into an AM curriculum in order to educate students on how best to take advantage of the design freedoms offered by the technologies.
In addition to introducing formal curricula and AM design methodologies, there is potential in addressing this need by leveraging informal learning experiences; i.e., extracurricular activities such as internships, design competitions, and student engineering professional societies, which have been shown to positively contribute to students’ engineering education. In this talk, Williams will present two novel informal learning experiences to engage students in DfAM principles: (i) the DreamVendor, an AM “vending machine” system, that provides students open access to automated AM systems, and (ii) the AM Vehicle Design Challenge, an open extracurricular design competition that challenged students to design, 3D Print, and pilot air/ground vehicles.  In addition to describing these informal DfAM learning experiences, assessment results of their impact on student learning will also be presented.

Speakers
avatar for Christopher B. Williams

Christopher B. Williams

Associate Professor, Virginia Tech
Christopher B. Williams is an Associate Professor and Electro Mechanical Corporation Faculty Fellow in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Virginia Tech. He holds affiliate faculty positions in the Department of Engineering Education and the Department of Material Science... Read More →


Saturday October 6, 2018 10:45am - 11:25am
Conference Room A

10:45am

Style for All: Designing Fashion Tech for Disability
There are few spaces to apply universal, interdisciplinary design methods and network with PWD to create accessible clothing. Open Style Lab ("OSL"), is a New York-based non-profit organization dedicated to creating innovative garment solution for people with disability, implements an interdisciplinary model for creating such solutions.  As a thought leader and R&D think-tank, OSL serves to fill a gap in the current market for adaptive clothing and wearable technologies by pioneering research where the universal role of clothing is a social integration tool integral to an individual's ability to engage with the surrounding community. We will be sharing several stories and case studies at Open Style Lab at Parsons School of Design that relate to 3d modeling, 3d printing or scanning. Examples may include past collaborative work and current work related to greater accessibility for NYC metro and 3D printing clothing closures.

Speakers
avatar for Grace Jun

Grace Jun

Open Style Lab
Grace Jun is a thought leader and community builder, working at the intersection of universal design & fashionable technology towards diversity & inclusion. She is an Assistant Professor of Fashion at Parsons School of Design, and the Executive Director at Open Style Lab (OSL), a... Read More →


Saturday October 6, 2018 10:45am - 11:25am
Salon III

10:45am

3D Printing Collaboration Experiences in the Arts and Sciences
Throughout the past year, each presenter has worked with another educator to bring 3D printing into their classroom for the first time. From this process, we have each learned important strategies along the way. We will share our experiences in guiding and mentoring other teachers new to 3D printing. The specifics our respective projects:  From Preschool birdhouses to Blanche Pope - diving in!!; Bringing 3D printing into a High School Fashion class; Design Thinking in Middle Grades Computer Science; and Exploring the Design, Modeling, and 3D Printing of Biochemical Molecules, will be discussed along with lessons learned and the follow-up support we will provide in moving forward to help other educators get their start in 3D printing.

A second part of the presentation involves our collaborative Pioneer Project creation of the UltibotD - an interactive desktop-sized Ultimaker Ultibot! We will share different approaches used with our students in designing and attaching accessories for the UltibotD.  Our collective experiences will illustrate the vast possibilities 3D printing can bring to education. We will engage and encourage attendees to join in the UltibotD Project so we can expand 3D printing's reach and make it more accessible to all.

Each presenter is a part of the Ultimaker Pioneer group. In this role we work to expand the understanding and application of 3D printing in education.  Sharing of our projects and the challenges we faced will hopefully encourage others to take their own stance in a similar approach.  We also believe that the Desktop Ultibot project is a great way to engage all types of classrooms and teachers level of experience.

Speakers
avatar for Greg Kent

Greg Kent

Technology Coordinator, Kailua Elementary School
Greg Kent is the Technology Coordinator at Kailua Elementary School and an Ultimaker Education Pioneer. He is passionate about growing the "maker mindset" and Design Thinking by focusing on meaningful integration of technology and putting tools into students' hands. His mission is... Read More →
avatar for Alex Larson

Alex Larson

Applied Technology Teacher, Palatine High School
Alex is an Applied Technology Teacher who has been teaching 3D printing and CNC machining in the classroom for 13 years. He currently teaches manufacturing, engineering, and research courses.
avatar for Kristen R. Schreck

Kristen R. Schreck

Assistant Professor of Mathematics, Saint Xavier University
Kristen R. Schreck, D.A., Assistant Professor of Mathematics at Saint Xavier University in Chicago, IL is an Ultimaker Education Pioneer. Her teaching interests include multivariable calculus, linear algebra, modern geometry, and the history of mathematics. She has published on the... Read More →


Saturday October 6, 2018 10:45am - 11:25am
Conference Room B

10:45am

Liberal Arts Math in 3D: Using 3D design to teach fractals, knots, and polyhedra
How can you use 3D printing and design to support a college mathematics course? In this talk we'll discuss one example of a hands-on inquiry-based mathematics course in JMU 3SPACE, a 3D printing classroom at James Madison University. In this course students directed their own explorations of fractals, mathematical cake cutting, knots, polyhedral graphs, infinite geometric series, and other mathematical topics while at the same time using 3D design programs like Tinkercad, OpenSCAD, Meshmixer, and Fusion 360 to construct and 3D print models to support those explorations.

Speakers

Saturday October 6, 2018 10:45am - 11:25am
Conference Room Four

10:45am

How to Train Your Teachers: Professional Development for 3D Printing
The gap between "techie" and "technophobe" can be hard to bridge when training K-12 teachers. The right kind of professional development can inspire more educators to begin 3D printing in their classrooms. The wrong kind of professional development can intimidate, confuse, and, worst of all, discourage teachers from introducing 3D printing to their students. In this session, we will explore a variety of methods for effectively reaching classroom teachers who are unfamiliar with 3D printing. We will also learn how to avoid pitfalls like overuse of technical jargon and the curse of knowledge.

Speakers

Saturday October 6, 2018 10:45am - 12:10pm
Conference Room Eight

11:30am

100kGarages
Make48 is partnering with Shopbot to relaunch 100k garages.
A network the allows everyday people to find maker, fabbers and crafters in their local area. Everyone has a big idea but only a few have the skills and network to build it.
Tom will discuss the platform, how it works and how students and colleges can get involved. 

Speakers
TG

Tom Gray

Tom Gray is the CEO for Make48 and Senior Product Strategist for The Handy Camel.


Saturday October 6, 2018 11:30am - 12:10pm
Salon III

11:30am

SudoHopper3D
SudoHopper3D, a card game to improve the overall understanding of parametric thinking. SudoHopper3D playfully takes you on a journey through mathematics, algorithms and basic coding. Players surprisingly learn concepts such as vector geometry, trigonometry and 3D Modeling, making their digital ideas a physical reality, ready for fabrication.

Speakers
AG

Andres Gonzalez

McNeel
Andrés is a software trainer and developer since the 1980s. He has developed applications for diverse design markets as well as training materials for different CAD and Design software including the community of training materials www.rhino3d.tvAndrés has been working with the... Read More →


Saturday October 6, 2018 11:30am - 12:10pm
Conference Room A

11:30am

Drawing Art Out Of Objects
Fused filament fabrication involves a specific aesthetic related to the process by which slicing software layers increments of lines to produce an object. In opposition to the traditional approach of focusing on high-resolution, and methods for trying to negate the layered aesthetic all together through post-processing, can we look at this essential aesthetic from an artistic perspective as drawing? Drawing, with the potential for exploring the visual residue of the process as a creative possibility. My presentation will cover the means by which I look at 3d printing through a veil of creating artworks for the contemporary art world that oscillate between sculpture and drawing with the intent of accepting the digital residue as part of the creative process where software, code, and machine play an integral part of making the art.

Speakers
avatar for Jonathan Hils

Jonathan Hils

Associate Professor, University of Oklahoma School of Visual Arts
Jonathan Hils is an Associate Professor of Sculpture at the University of Oklahoma School of Visual Arts where he teaches courses in sculpture and digital fabrication. Having created an extensive fab lab for 3d printing (plastics and ceramics), laser cutting, CNC routing, and CNC... Read More →


Saturday October 6, 2018 11:30am - 12:10pm
Conference Room B

11:30am

Guiding and Grading Mathematical Art
My students use Mathematica to design 3D printed mathematical sculptures. But how to guide and assess their work? I will discuss the framework I provide that enables the students' creativity to shine through no matter what level of mathematical knowledge or programming experience they have. And I'll discuss the deliverables and grading scheme that I've developed to ensure that students' work is thoughtful, refined through a revision process, and is commensurate with their ability.

Speakers
avatar for Christopher Hanusa

Christopher Hanusa

Associate Professor, Queens College of the City University of New York
Christopher Hanusa is a mathematician, mathematics educator, and mathematical artist at Queens College of the City University of New York. He uses Mathematica to design mathematical art and jewelry, and shares these techniques with his students. Visit his webpage at http://qcpages.qc.cuny.edu/~chanusa... Read More →



Saturday October 6, 2018 11:30am - 12:10pm
Conference Room Four

11:30am

How to manage students, 3d printers and data at scale
While 3D printing continues to grow and gain traction for educational institutions across the world, logistical challenges still plague programs starting and expanding today. It's difficult to dedicate time and resources to tracking student usage and training machine specific workflows. This is the problem 3DPrinterOS set out to solve in providing a single platform for educators to offer students campus-wide 3d printing. Focusing on examples from our work with other top universities, we will discuss how to collect and report program data, integrate seamlessly into existing IT infrastructure and maximize access to limited printer resources.

Speakers
avatar for Aaron Roy

Aaron Roy

COO, 3DPrinterOS
Aaron Roy is one of the leading innovators in educational 3D printing software. He is the co-founder and COO of 3DPrinterOS, the world's first cloud management platform for users, files and 3D printers. His contributions are part of the "3D Printing Revolution" class on Coursera and... Read More →


Saturday October 6, 2018 11:30am - 12:10pm
Conference Room C

12:30pm

Carbide3D: Digital Fabrication in the Classroom
This workshop is designed for teachers and educators to get a better understanding of how desktop CNC mills like the Nomad Pro can be integrated into STEAM/STEM curriculum.
This workshop will walk through a basic classroom project with information about scaling to different classroom sizes and abilities.
Part one: design thinking overview with a hands on activity
Part two: tools and resources
Part three: connection to curriculum and application across content areas


Saturday October 6, 2018 12:30pm - 2:10pm
Conference Room D

12:45pm

BoF: 3D printing Assistive Technology
Come share assistive devices you have made, considerations in making AT, and learn from others that are doing similar work. Let’s talk about how to share innovations and help them scale.

Speakers
avatar for Chad Leaman

Chad Leaman

Director of Innovation, Neil Squire Society


Saturday October 6, 2018 12:45pm - 1:25pm
Conference Room Four

12:45pm

BoF: Meet Benetech’s Imageshare, a registry for tactile models for the visually impaired
Have you ever made an accessible 3D model that you thought might be helpful for another educator or student with special needs? Come learn about Benetech’s Imageshare tool and how this new platform differs from other repositories.

Saturday October 6, 2018 12:45pm - 1:25pm
Conference Room Eight

12:45pm

BoF: The 3D Printing Handbook by 3D Hubs
3D Hubs' is excited to be here at Construct3D this year! We've taken all our knowledge and experience in the 3d printing space and created the 3D Printing Handbook, which you should have received as part of your swag bag!

Come and join in on the discussion of the 3D Printing Handbook. We'll cover contents of the book briefly (fundamentals of various printing processes, best practices and example applications ) before opening up group discussions on how you, as educators, see this book being implemented in your classrooms! Whether its an excercise, project or workshop concept, we want to hear from you!

Flip thru the book, come with ideas and questions!

We are also in the early stages of planning campus/site visits with workshops, come and let us know how 3D Hubs can help you.

Speakers
avatar for Anderson Ta

Anderson Ta

Education Manager, 3D Hubs
I'm the Education Manager at 3D Hubs, we've gathered our knowledge and experience in 3D printing and created the 3D Printing Handbook. I'm working to get this resource into the hands of as many educators as possible. Talk to me about content you want to see available to more educators... Read More →



Saturday October 6, 2018 12:45pm - 1:25pm
Conference Room A

1:30pm

e-NABLE: state of a movement empowered by 3D-printing
Inspired by a trans-continental collaboration between a South African carpenter and a Washington State prop-maker, e-NABLE has become a movement with chapters in 100 countries and a presence (in the form of 3D printed prosthetic hand devices) in many makerspaces.  

e-NABLE's 3D pioneers are prototyping of an emerging pattern: "Connected Humanitarianism" in which open source methodologies, and digital collaboration tools exemplified by 3D printing are used to design and deliver radically inexpensive solutions to underserved populations. 

By understanding,  amplifying, and generalizing e-NABLE's successes, and by  recognizing and addressing e-NABLE's shortcomings, the 3D-printing community can help make the world a better place.

Speakers
avatar for Jon Schull

Jon Schull

Founder, e-NABLE
Jon Schull is Founder of e-NABLE, the global network of volunteers using 3D printers to make radically inexpensive prosthetics for underserved amputees. | | He is also co-Founder of Rochester Enable Limited, a 501(c)3 that administers the EnableFund and supports the Rochester Enable... Read More →


Saturday October 6, 2018 1:30pm - 2:10pm
Conference Room A

1:30pm

Hand Drawn CNC
Imagine watching as a machine carves a path you drew into a block of wood. You can remember the arc of each curve under your hand and now see how it influences the material. We understand better what we can see, and even better what we can control. In many cases the control of a CNC machine is a long way from human intervention. This is part of the strength of the machines but prevents innovation and the discovery of new strategies. It also leads to many thinking of these machines as black boxes, causing frustrations when the results are not what was intended. In workshops I have explored how students interact with a machine when then get to first draw the paths, as a way of creating work but more, importantly understanding the power and limitations of CNC machines. I also hope this will lead to discussions of how best to introduce thinking about digitial manufacturing and how this can link more broadly to the curriculum.

Speakers
avatar for Edmund Harriss

Edmund Harriss

Professor, University of Arkansas
Edmund Harriss is a mathematician and mathematical artist, driven by a passion to communicate the beauty and utility of mathematical thinking beyond the discipline. In particular his work builds stronger bridges between research, theory, practice and pedagogy for the use of digital... Read More →


Saturday October 6, 2018 1:30pm - 2:10pm
Conference Room B

1:30pm

Towards Sustainable Additive Manufacturing in University Makerspaces
Additive manufacturing is being broadly adopted and popular in university makerspaces.
Desktop Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) is the most common equipment in makerspaces
because of its ease of use, compact size and affordable price. Many novices choose to use
desktop FDM printers because of its easy operation, but they could make improper design and
operation decisions which unnecessarily increase the fabrication failures. If we are moving
towards a future where desktop FDM printers are in every school and office, like conventional
printers, then these machines will consume a large amount of energy and materials. Since there
are so many different brands and types of printers using different raw materials under different
scenarios, it is very difficult to evaluate the environmental impacts of FDM printers. In addition,
few studies identify the causes of fabrication failures. This study analyzes material and energy
consumption, uncertainty and variability for desktop-grade FDM printers using ABS and PLA
material in two university makerspaces. In addition, this study examines how users’ expertise
and experience level in an open studio environment affects rates of the printing failures. From
the results, more ubiquitous access to FDM printing may create a significant addition to the
waste stream. Moreover, higher education level and higher printing frequencies tend to decrease
the number of failed prints. Based on the results, practices are suggested to decrease the
fabrication failures.

Speakers
avatar for Ruoyu Song

Ruoyu Song

Ph.D. student, Georgia Institute of Technology
Ruoyu Song is a third-year Ph.D. student in the CASS Lab of Georgia Tech studying Mechanical Engineering. Ruoyu’s current studies focus on | the failure modes in both additive and subtractive manufacturing, and the impacts of design to manufacturing processes.


Saturday October 6, 2018 1:30pm - 2:10pm
Conference Room Eight

1:30pm

Random Art Generator
In this workshop, participants will be designing 3D forms with Beetle Blocks, a coding environment that can be used to extrude material following a path in three dimensions. Beetle Blocks is based on Scratch and Snap! and uses drag and drop blocks for programming.
Participants will create blocks for forms of their design with sets of parameters. These parameters can receive a range of numbers at random that will generate unique artwork each time the program is run.

This workshop will start with student work examples and an overview of the project including the resources presenter used with her students to get them started with 3D printing and generative art. The workshop will cover 1) how to get started with Beetle Blocks 2) create a simple block that will make up the basic forms for the random art generator 3) create custom blocks with random inputs 4) generate designs 5) export 3D design file of choice 6) and methods for printing.


Speakers
avatar for Erin Riley

Erin Riley

Director, E+D Lab, Greenwich Academy


Saturday October 6, 2018 1:30pm - 2:55pm
Conference Room Four

1:30pm

TestingOurWaters.net - Empowering citizen scientists to track and together prevent marine pollution
In less than 100 years we have polluted all of our oceans with plastic - scientists estimate 270,000 metric tons from 5.25 Trillion pieces. 

The TestingOurWaters.net project offers a multi-pronged, design centered, technology driven approach to reducing the accumulation of plastics in local waterways and international oceans through active community engagement.  

This 90 minute workshop will show how design and technology can be used to create, develop, and distribute citizen science trawls for identifying the source of contamination. After understanding the scale of the problem, participants will learn how to 3D print Trawls from recycled filament. These inexpensive Trawls can then be used to skim the surface of the water and document the synthetic debris. Data collected from Trawling expeditions will be used to locate and ultimately prevent plastic pollution.

Speakers
avatar for Barent Roth

Barent Roth

Designer/Educator, Anthropocene.Design
Barent Roth is a designer, educator, activist dedicated to sustainable products, practices, and services. Co-founder of the award winning sustainable to restorative design firm grow-design, creator of the LA Green Drinks network, and former Executive Director of SustainableWorks.org... Read More →


Saturday October 6, 2018 1:30pm - 2:55pm
Conference Room C

2:15pm

Houston, We Have a 3D Print in Space
Deanne shares how her background as a design engineer and television host, combined with a phone call to NASA, inspired her to create Future Engineers, a technology platform that hosts national challenges where students design useful tools, containers, and objects for astronauts to 3D print in space. She will explore why 3D printing is so important to the future of space travel and how 3D challenges are inspiring the next generation of designers, engineers, and astronauts.

Speakers
avatar for Deanne Bell

Deanne Bell

Founder/CEO, Future Engineers
I'm a TV Host (CNBC, ESPN, Discovery) and the founder of Future Engineers, an online challenge hub for kids, teens, and classrooms. Future Engineers hosts NASA and the ASME Foundation's 3D Space Challenge series, which has produced historic achievements including the first student-designed... Read More →


Saturday October 6, 2018 2:15pm - 2:55pm
Conference Room A

2:15pm

Making “Making” Accessible
Dr. Hurst (@amyhurst ) will present Making “Making” Accessible, featuring her work collaborating with physical therapists to create 3D printed assistive technologies. In this talk, she will discuss their work understanding the potential and reality of using 3D printing to create DIY Assistive Technologies from both the clinician and end-user perspective. She will also discuss several of the challenges non-engineers face learning these technologies and their work together to overcome them.

Speakers
avatar for Amy Hurst

Amy Hurst

Associate Professor of Human-Centered Computing
Dr. Amy Hurst is an Associate Professor of Human-Centered Computing in the Information Systems Department whose research focuses on empowering technology, with projects investigating automatically adaptive interfaces and DIY-Assistive Technology. She is interested in working to help... Read More →


Saturday October 6, 2018 2:15pm - 2:55pm
Conference Room B

2:15pm

Out of Hand: Authorship and Robotics in Additive Manufacturing
The definition of authorship, and the interaction between humans and tools, was explored during a series of classroom experiments that revealed the latent design opportunities within an industrial robotic arm during the additive manufacturing process. A diagnostic of a KUKA robotic arm identified opportunities in the movements of the arm as a means to explore alternative methods of depositing material and embedding prototype production as part of the design feedback process. As is the case with most technology, the manner in which designers choose to engage these tools can be varied, though it is often under the assumption that the technology will function as an efficient replicator; a means to an end in the translation of a digital model to physical prototype. 

This study contributes to the conversation around design automation, standardization, and ultimately designer authorship, by highlighting the importance of feedback between the designer and the production process. The methodology used in this study purposely sought to limit user operations in order to release control back to the design mediums: production technology, material, and digital input. This allowed the mediums to participate in the design process in unexpected ways, acting as a contributor, and not as a subordinate tool.

Speakers
avatar for James Kerestes

James Kerestes

Assistant Professor, Ball State University
James F. Kerestes is an Assistant Professor of Architecture at Ball State University College of Architecture and Planning and the director of HIVE: Design Collective, an interdisciplinary research group in the field of architecture and design. From 2013 through 2015, James was selected... Read More →


Saturday October 6, 2018 2:15pm - 2:55pm
Conference Room Eight

3:00pm

Incorporating Design Thinking into Curriculum
This talk will detail the work of the Innovation and Design Collaborative at Georgia Tech, and how this initiative has used design thinking to provide new courses, multi-disciplinary research, projects, and outreach to the Institute community and greater Atlanta area. It will also detail a few of the current course offerings and advise the audience on how to incorporate design thinking into project based learning.

Speakers
avatar for Wayne Li

Wayne Li

Professor, Georgia Institute of Technology
Wayne K. Li is the James L. Oliver Professor, which is a joint position between the Colleges of Design and Engineering. Through classes and the Innovation and Design Collaboration (IDC), he leads joint teaching initiatives and advances interdisciplinary collaboration between mechanical... Read More →


Saturday October 6, 2018 3:00pm - 3:40pm
Conference Room A

3:00pm

3D Printing as the Bridge to Polymer Materials and STEM Outreach
The realm of 3D printing has enabled advances in processing, fabrication, and materials science. Specifically, polymer materials science and engineering has been traditionally taught and done as a research based on macromolecular science and conventional processing (molding, extrusion, thermoforming, etc.). This talk will focus on highlighting the transformative approach of 3D Printing in research of polymer materials, teaching of courses in polymer processing (structure-property relationship), mentoring of students, and STEM outreach all the way to projects related to Engineers without Borders. Using the platform of FDM, SLA, SLA, VSP, the various formats of polymer chemistry and processing has gained new light in teaching structure-property relationship in materials and defining new chemistries including nanocomposite materials. The Author will draw several examples of: 1) research in advanced nanocomposites, 2) teaching of EMAC 276 a course on processing and application of polymers, and 3) STEM outreach for K-12 through Engineers without Borders. Several projects will also be highlighted that has resulted in recent publications and funding opportunities which can set as an example for other academic faculty and institutions.

Speakers
avatar for Rigoberto Advincula

Rigoberto Advincula

Professor, Case Western Reserve University
Rigoberto Advincula is Professor at the Department of Macromolecular Science and Engineering, Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio, USA. He is a Fellow of the American Chemical Society (ACS), Fellow of the Polymer Science and Engineering Division (ACS), Fellow of the... Read More →


Saturday October 6, 2018 3:00pm - 3:40pm
Conference Room Eight

3:00pm

Digital Sculpting for CNC and 3D Printing
This session discusses techniques for digital sculpting and fabrication that I have used in both my research and teaching. In contrast, to many forms of generating 3D objects, digital sculpting is a form of high-resolution modeling that is similar to working with digital clay in that it can be pushed, pulled, carved, and shaped intuitively. Additionally, using virtual reality touch controllers or pressure sensitive tablets allows a tactile approach in which the the user's hand intuitively shapes the forms. Virtual reality is an immersive digitally created experience that simulates visual, spatial, and aural cues through the use of a head mounted display and sensors that can track the movements of the head and hands. With current systems, users have agency to use their bodies to move around the virtual space, and choose to look in any direction. Using a range of approaches including Virtual Reality (or VR) sculpting, pressure sensitive graphics tablets, and grayscale image based modeling, I will demonstrate how I and my students use these tools for 3D printing, CNC routing, and digital mold-making. The resulting objects that I will present are created in XPS foam, resin, bronze, wood, and ceramics.

Saturday October 6, 2018 3:00pm - 3:40pm
Conference Room Four

3:00pm

Tech-cessibility: Design & instruction of 3D-technologies for non-engineer minds
3D-technologies have the potential to help solve many of the world's most pervasive and complex problems in healthcare, but what good are they if very few individuals have the expertise to use them effectively? We can bridge the gap between the often-steep learning curve of 3D-technologies and the applications for which they would be most useful by leveraging concepts familiar to those who study Human Computer Interaction (HCI). Through careful examination of two different real-world implementations of 3D-technology training-- one for non-engineer clinicians within a rehabilitative clinic in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, and the other for students within an interdisciplinary undergraduate course setting in the United States, we distill and unpack the HCI concepts most vital to the design of 3D-tech translation software applications, products and pedagogy: usability, user experience, and ethnographic research.

Speakers
avatar for Jade Myers

Jade Myers

Founder, PORTAL
Founder of The PORTAL (Prosthetics, Orthotics, Research, Technology & Accessibility Lab) at the Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT), Jade has served as Research & Development Associate and Haiti Project Team Lead for LimbForge, a non-profit specializing in increasing access to... Read More →


Saturday October 6, 2018 3:00pm - 3:40pm
Conference Room B

3:00pm

The Fabrication, Assembly, and Evaluation of Open Source Prosthetics
With the advent of low-cost desktop 3D printing, people throughout the world have been designing, printing and distributing a variety of open source prosthetic hands and arms. One of the driving forces behind this work has been the eNABLE Online Community of volunteers, comprising medical professionals, professors, teachers, artists, designers, engineers and makers. This workshop focuses on teaching the fabrication, assembly and testing of the three most common 3D printed prosthetic hand/arm designs developed through eNABLE: the Phoenix Hand, the Unlimbited Arm and the Gripper Palm. Participants will learn specific 3D printer settings for each device and get hands-on experience by assembling these devices in-person with eNABLE experts. In addition, the workshop will cover how to assess if a device is properly assembled through quantitative testing procedures. We will share tests that have been developed by students from elementary through post-secondary levels and challenge participants to develop their own testing protocols to assess each design. While we anticipate a focus on how these devices can be used in an educational setting (absent a recipient), we will briefly cover some best practices for fitting to users and share some results and lessons learned from worldwide uses of eNABLE devices.

Speakers
avatar for Eric Joseph Bubar

Eric Joseph Bubar

Professor, Marymount University
Eric Bubar is an Associate Professor of Physics at Marymount University. He holds a B.S. in Applied Physics from Appalachian State University and an M.S. and PhD in Physics from Clemson University. He began volunteering with the eNABLE community when a student introduced him to the... Read More →
avatar for Tanya Lerch

Tanya Lerch

Teacher, Sage Hill
Tanya joined Sage Hill in 2016 from Convent of the Sacred Heart in NYC where she taught AP Statistics, Geometry, and Algebra 2. She serves as an AP reader in Statistics each year and is currently teaching AP Statistics and Applied Statistics and serves as the 12th grade Dean at Sage... Read More →


Saturday October 6, 2018 3:00pm - 4:25pm
Conference Room C

3:40pm

Saturday Afternoon Coffee sponsored by Proto-Pasta
Saturday October 6, 2018 3:40pm - 4:05pm
Georgia Tech Hotel 800 Spring St NW, Atlanta, GA 30308

4:05pm

4D Printing: Making Additive Manufacturing Alive
4D printing is a novel concept that emerges in recent years, benefiting from the rapid development of advanced 3D printing technologies and active materials. In 4D printing, upon external stimuli on demand, a 3D printed part can change its shapes as a function of time, which becomes the 4th dimension of the shape forming process. 4D printing offers the advantages of forming complicated 3D shapes from low dimensional structures, saving printing materials and printing times, etc. These make it suitable for applications including morphing structures, sensors, actuators, and soft robots. In this talk, we start with the concept of 4D printing. We will then illustrate a few methods of how we use the mechanics in photopolymerization to general shape shifting structures. These include a direct 4D printing where we use the residual stress generated during inkjet 3D printing, a digital light printing method where we use the grayscale in digital light processing to control the photocuring-induced residual stress for 2D and 3D structures.  Finally, we discuss the challenge and future directions for 4D printing

Speakers
avatar for H. Jerry Qi

H. Jerry Qi

Professor, Georgia Institute of Technology
Dr. H. Jerry Qi is Professor and the Woodruff Faculty Fellow in the George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering at Georgia Tech. He received his bachelor degree and graduate degrees from Tsinghua University and a Doctor of Science degree from Massachusetts Institute of Technology... Read More →


Saturday October 6, 2018 4:05pm - 4:45pm
Conference Room A

4:05pm

3D printing molecular models for chemistry education: challenges and triumphs
Most simply, chemistry is about the relationship of atoms in 3D space. For the chemistry student, appreciating these 3D arrangements is a critical step in understanding core concepts. Molecular models have been used in chemistry education for decades, and interacting directly with physical 3D models improves student learning outcomes. However, because of their cost and limited components, most chemistry courses are still dependent on 2D images or graphical representations of 3D structures. 3D printing technology offers a unique platform for creating highly-tailored molecular models to provide teachers new methods and activities for enhancing student learning. However, there are challenges inherent to printing molecular structures, chief among them being that complex structures often require many support structures, leading to increased material consumption, and significant post-printing processing. I will describe a software add-on for the Blender 3D modeling package that allows users to interactively split molecules into smaller components to simplify 3D printing. Automated placement of “pins” on bonds and “holes” in atoms allows for the rapid creation of complex ball-and-stick molecular structure models that are easy to print and assemble. Several course activities that make use of this software and 3D printed models, including lessons on molecular symmetry and protein folding, will be highlighted.

Speakers
avatar for Paul Paukstelis

Paul Paukstelis

Associate Professor of Biochemistry, University of Maryland, College Park
Associate Professor of Biochemistry at the University of Maryland, College Park. For the last several years Prof. Paukstelis has been working to integrate 3D printing technology with chemistry education.


Saturday October 6, 2018 4:05pm - 4:45pm
Conference Room B

4:05pm

Developing a Project Based 2-8 Fabrication Curriculum
Pine Crest School opened Innovation Labs on its campuses in Boca Raton and Ft. Lauderdale in August 2015 and filled them with a variety of tools and materials including 3D Printers and other fabrication devices. Finding the right CAD and other design software and the best ways to teach all levels of students to effectively create with it was one of the first challenges we approached. What we have learned in the past three years is that digital fabrication and 3d design isn't just about the software and the machines. Early childhood and ongoing experiences creating with construction sets and paper-based materials like cardboard give students skills and experiences necessary before they can use fabrication machines for more than just printing something from Thingiverse. I will discuss the development process, lessons learned, and the current state of our grade 3-8 fabrication curriculum and how it relates to the majority of projects we undertake in our school makerspace.

Speakers
avatar for Kris Swanson

Kris Swanson

Innovation Specialist, Pine Crest School
Kris Swanson is an Innovation Specialist at Pine Crest School in Boca Raton, FL where he works with PK - 8th Grade students and their teachers to integrate making into the school's traditional curriculum. He is also the co-creator and owner of Young Makers Lab, a makerspace for kids... Read More →



Saturday October 6, 2018 4:05pm - 4:45pm
Conference Room Four

4:05pm

3D Printing Benefits for the Art Room and Special Needs Students
In this session, attendees will learn how a collaboration between an art and a design teacher at two different schools/districts collaborated to help design a drawing prosthetic, using design thinking and 3D printing. In this session, we will be talking about the design process and using 3D printing to help Sara, who is a young artist who has spastic cerebral palsy, draw for the first time using an aid my senior students at the Charter High School for Architecture and designed and 3D printed for her. We will also be discussing my students and how working and visiting with the Comcast Accessibility Lab in Philadelphia helped them understand empathy and designing for someone with special needs.Both presenters will talk about how using the 3D printer can change the lives of students and teachers, and how 3D printing and design thinking have a role in that process.

Presentation: https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/19LDheWEhAtC_dIIQiIiq-0tcdURiuBcCjGJcOxeCqi8/edit?usp=sharing
 

Speakers
avatar for Laura Roth

Laura Roth

Art Teacher, Marsh Creek Sixth Grade Center
Laura Roth is an active fine artist, art teacher and graphic designer at Marsh Creek Sixth Grade Center in Downingtown Area School District in Downingtown, Pennsylvania. She has presented at the Pennsylvania Art Education Association (PAEA) Conference in 2015 and 2017, the National... Read More →
avatar for Christopher Sweeney

Christopher Sweeney

Design Teacher, Charter High School for Architecture and Design
Mr. Christopher Sweeney is a 1996 graduate of University of the Art’s Philadelphia College of Art and Design with a B.F.A. in Fine Arts/ Painting and Drawing, and recently received his M.A., also from the University of the Arts, in 2012. He most recently received the 2016 Pennsylvania... Read More →


Saturday October 6, 2018 4:05pm - 4:50pm
Conference Room Eight

4:50pm

Poster Session

Diverse Applications of 3D Printing in College Curriculum, Nathaniel Bohna,  organization/institution: Penn State, Fayette Campus, 
Lending 3D-printers: The nuts & bolts of circulating 3D technology, Jean Bossart,  organization/institution:University of Florida,  co-presenters: Sara Gonzalez, 
Investigating the Applications of 3D Printing in Morphing Wing Design, Tarun Golla,      organization/institution: Loudoun Academy Of Science, co-presenters: Sundar Thirukkurungudi, Adithya Muralikrishna, 
Performance of SMA actuators using 3D Printed NinjaFlex Reinforcement Structures, Ankita Kalkar,  organization/institution:  Academy of Science, co-presenters: Sundaram Thirukkurungudi, 
Personalized Learning, Design Thinking, and the 3D Design Process, Greg Kent,   organization/institution:  Kailua Elementary School,co-presenters: Raylene Tom, 
3D printing a silicone dextrous model with mechanical metamaterials, NicoleSeman,      organization/institution: Loudoun Academy of Science, co-presenters: Sundaram Thirukkurungudi, 
3D printing to enhance bioinspired design research and education, Thomas Spencer,  organization/institution: Georgia Institute of Technology
3D Printing for Fruit Flies, Gabriel Antoniak, Duke University
Duke University eNable: 3D Printing Adaptive Devices, Duke University eNable, Duke University
Natural Fun: Building with Nature and Tech, Emily Takara, organization/institution:  Wings of Innovation (Girls' Design Club), co-presenters: Lauren Lee, Trisha Sathish  
Create a 3D Home Using Real-Life Application in Math, Robin Trusty, organization/institution:  Lausanne Collegiate School

Saturday October 6, 2018 4:50pm - 6:30pm
Salon IV, V, VI
 
Sunday, October 7
 

7:00am

Breakfast
Sunday October 7, 2018 7:00am - 8:15am
Georgia Tech Hotel 800 Spring St NW, Atlanta, GA 30308

8:00am

Opening Remarks
Sunday October 7, 2018 8:00am - 8:30am
Grand Ballroom

8:30am

Sunday Morning Keynote
Speakers
avatar for Larry Rosenstock

Larry Rosenstock

High Tech High


Sunday October 7, 2018 8:30am - 9:30am
Salon I, II, III

9:30am

Sunday Morning Coffee Break sponsored by Maker Box
Sunday October 7, 2018 9:30am - 10:00am
Georgia Tech Hotel 800 Spring St NW, Atlanta, GA 30308

10:00am

3D Printing: Creating New Career Paths for Students
3D printing is creating opportunities to expand traditional STEM instruction into new disciplines. This presentation provides an overview of how educators are using 3D printing to modernize design engineering, and explore future potential for new career paths with their students.

Speakers

Sunday October 7, 2018 10:00am - 10:40am
Conference Room A

10:00am

How a high school design project ended up becoming an online business
Hear about the process my 9th – 12th grade students and I went through in transforming a 3D modeling/printing class project into a social entrepreneur project and finally into a business. It was not a straight-forward process and included failures and missteps, but we were able to implement our Incredible Backpack Hook solution in our science and design classrooms to make them safer and more fun. Then we took it a step further and started selling our hooks online. This authentic 3D design project that led to an entrepreneurial opportunity was a wonderful learning experience for me and my design students, and I think that other schools and teachers could benefit from adopting such an approach. Learn how we setup our 3D printing system to make it easier for the students to use them as prototyping machines, which was essential if we were going to iterate our way to successful products for the marketplace. Hear about the lessons we learned about using an outside 3D printing manufacturer. Also learn about how we used Autodesk Fusion 360, TinkerCAD, Meshmixer and OpenSCAD.

My students learned so much more by adding the entrepreneurial aspect of the project. It gave it meaning and the realistic standards pushed them to work harder, be more persistent, be more demanding of themselves and increased their motivation. But I don’t think any of this would have been possible without our 3D printer solution in our makerspace.

Finally, our project took advantage of our new Spark Tank Entrepreneurial Program at the Dwight School that offers guidance, funding and expertise to K-12 students who want to develop their own idea, service, organization or business. The students presented their ideas to the Spark Tank judges and walked away with $4,000 in funding which was essential for us to move forward. As a result of their participation in the Incredible Backpack Hook project, the seniors also received college scholarships from the Dwight Innovation Foundation.

Speakers
avatar for Steve Farnsworth

Steve Farnsworth

MakerED Teacher, Avenues: The World School
Steve Farnsworth. Middle school and high school teacher of many years in MakerEd, technology, design, robotics, design technology, 3D modeling and 3D printing. Longtime Logo Institute workshop leader in robotics, programming and physical computing. Middle school and high school MakerEd... Read More →


Sunday October 7, 2018 10:00am - 10:40am
Conference Room Four

10:00am

Increasing Access: Fabrication Success in the K-8 classroom
This talk will show direct steps to implement digital fabrication program into the traditional k-8 classroom. We will showcase 2 programs where schools had no access to fabrication devices but were able to implement 3D design and Laser Cutting curriculum through community partnerships., and how through eventual grant writing efforts built full MakerSpaces with in the school. Example curriculum units will be shared along with grant connections for replicating this process at your own location.

Speakers
avatar for Brandy Jackson

Brandy Jackson

Owner and Curriculum Designer, Mobile MakerSpace
Brandy Jackson is a nationally recognized STEAM educator in the area of digital fabrication in k-8 settings. In 2015, she began a passion project called the Mobile MakerSpace. The mobile lab brings digital fabrication lessons to after school programs, recreation centers, elementary... Read More →


Sunday October 7, 2018 10:00am - 10:40am
Conference Room B

10:00am

Patito Feo: 3D Printing and Storytelling for the Blind
Patito Feo, Spanish for Ugly Duckling, is a research project done in Atlantic University College with the collaboration of professors, students and project mentors. With the intention of creating inclusive storytelling, the goal of the project was to create 3D printable sculptures for blind or visually-impaired kids from the ages of 6 through 8 years old. The story is based on our own adaptation of Hans Christian Andersen's The Ugly Duckling story. Teachers would read the story out loud while students explore the story and its characters by touching the sculptures. As the project progressed, so did our goals and ambitions. At the end, we developed our own adaptation of the story, 6 3D printable sculptures, an audiobook, an illustrated book and a 3D printable braille book that includes tactile illustrations. All done in-house, using our Professor's and student's talent. The session is not only an introduction to the project which is scheduled to be released online as downloadable content but also a behind the scenes look. The session includes lessons learned, design tips and tricks, what we learned through failing and prototyping and how we tested the results.
Patito Feo, Spanish for Ugly Duckling, is a research project done in Atlantic University College with the collaboration of professors, students and project mentors. With the intention of creating inclusive storytelling, the goal of the project was to create 3D printable sculptures for blind or visually-impaired kids from the ages of 6 through 8 years old. The story is based on our own adaptation of Hans Christian Andersen's The Ugly Duckling story. As the project progressed, so did our goals and ambitions. At the end, we developed our own adaptation of the story, 6 3D printable sculptures, an audiobook, an illustrated book and a 3D printable braille book that includes tactile illustrations. All done in-house, using our Professor's and student's talent. The workshop is an in-depth look of how braille was designed, modeled and implemented into the project sculptures and braille book. A look into what makes braille signs or braille text ADA compliant and how to develop them using OpenSCAD. Workshop includes 3d printing technical tips and best practices for the implementation of the braille text into other models and for fabrication.

Speakers
avatar for Vicente Gascó

Vicente Gascó

Fab Lab Director / Professor, Atlantic University College
Professor, product designer and entrepreneur in 3D printing-related applications. Vicente Gascó is recognized in Puerto Rico as a 3D printing pioneer. Founder of product design studio Tredé and Fabrication Lab Director and additive manufacturing professor in Atlantic University... Read More →


Sunday October 7, 2018 10:00am - 10:40am
Conference Room Eight

10:00am

How Will Efforts to Introduce 3D Printing in Education Help in Shaping the Skills for the Workforce of the Future?
A panel of educators and industry allies roll up their sleeves to discuss education and 3D printing from a holistic perspective rather than limiting discussion to a traditional rhetoric regarding workforce development policy. We have heard a number of talks this conference indicating the widening skills gap in the United States in manufacturing and industry, as well as opportunities that exploring these technologies brings to learners destined for STEM/STEAM trajectory careers, including ones where 3D printing and digital fabrication plays merely secondary or tertiary role.


This panel takes a practical and realistic look at a number of the routes by which 3D printing is introduced to bring students and learners into design and technical expertise — the maker movement, engineering & design coursework,  interdisciplinary/campus-wide makerspaces, the fab lab movement, and direct industry training and certification. These routes are considered along with a few of the future endpoints in manufacturing, industry, and design professions. 


Are these opportunities to learn about this technology preparing learners for success in future careers? Will the routes aimed to add more technically skilled workers address our manufacturing skill gap? How likely will time spent exploring 3D printing earlier in one’s educational career prepare learners for identifying and performing in the new professional jobs of tomorrow?


The panel has been selected because it represents perspectives on this topic with differing allegiances and values — and we are hoping to use this discussion to enlarge audience understanding of promising routes to explore with students and learners, and make discoveries, rather than to present a consensus view.




The panel includes:
- Sarah Boisvert. Long time veteran of laser machine industry and other manufacturing technologies, a key part of Fab Lab movement in USA, and author of The New Collar Workforce.
- Becky Button. A Maker, involved in content creation in the Maker Movement.
- Justin Hopkins. An application engineer from HP in their additive strategy efforts. He is also the critical person who set up SCADs makerspace and influenced the direction of their 3D printing and digital fabrication strategies.


- Matthew Wettergreen - Engineering design professor from Rice University (OEDK). Also deeply engaged in field work that puts into direct action the engineering design methodology he teaches to students at Rice.




Moderators
avatar for Matt Griffin

Matt Griffin

Director of Community, Ultimaker
Matt Griffin is the Director of Community for Ultimaker North America. He is a writer, teacher, and consultant, and is currently creating a book on design for 3D printing. He has taught Digital Fabrication at Maryland Institute College of Arts (MICA) and through Coursera. Matt is... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Sarah Boisvert

Sarah Boisvert

Staff, Fab Lab Hub
Sarah Boisvert has worked in Digital Fabrication including laser micro machining, 3D Printing and CAD design for over 30 years.  She co-founded the commercial division of Potomac Photonics, Inc. which built excimer lasers and laser machine tools for the medical device, biotech and... Read More →
avatar for Becky Button

Becky Button

Becky has been an avid 3D printing designer for several years, even though she is only 17. Her interest in 3D printing led her to an opportunity to intern at Virginia Tech to conduct additional research on additive manufacturing in the summer of 2017. Recently, Becky designed a pair... Read More →
avatar for Justin S Hopkins

Justin S Hopkins

Applications Engineer, HP Inc
Justin Hopkins is an Applications Engineer with Hewlett Packard Inc. who works withcompanies to reinvent their manufacturing processes through the use of technology. Justinbelieves there are tools that help build the world around us and we are now enablingeveryone to have access to... Read More →
avatar for Matthew Wettergreen

Matthew Wettergreen

lecturer, Rice University
Matthew Wettergreen received his Ph.D. from Rice University in Bioengineering with a focus on 3D printing and the design of bone repair scaffolds. After receiving his Ph.D. Matthew went on to found Caroline Collective, Houston's first coworking space. In 2011 Matthew began as a lecturer... Read More →


Sunday October 7, 2018 10:00am - 10:55am
Salon III

10:00am

Computerized Clay - Digital Sculpting for Beginners
Digital sculpting programs allow you to manipulate digital "clay" to create unique, organic forms for 3D printing. Sculpting provides an intuitive way for students to quickly create custom printable objects, even if they've never used a CAD program. We'll take a look at a variety of free tools for teaching digital sculpting, then we'll learn how to use SculptGL, a free, browser-based tool that works on Mac, Windows, and Chrome OS. Together, we'll learn how to manipulate the digital clay with a three-button mouse, how to apply the principles of design to sculpt a creature, and download a printable model. Then, we will explore ways your students can use these tools to demonstrate their learning.

Speakers

Sunday October 7, 2018 10:00am - 11:25am
Conference Room C

10:45am

Importance of Digital Fabrication in High School PBL Environments
This panel will discuss the importance of using digital fabrication and rapid prototyping machines to help students in a high school setting prepare for project-based learning environments at many engineering universities. The panel consists of four unique collaborators; a university engineering design instructor and public school advocate, an engineering instructor with a unique connection to STEM education and the high school where he now teaches, and two female high school students who actively participate in their school's engineering courses and maker club. They will discuss their experiences with the digital fabrication equipment recommended by a local, leading university makerspace staff. The panelists will elaborate on the importance for public schools, universities, and businesses to collaborate on the implementation and use of industry-standard fabrication machinery. There will be a brief welcome and thank you; explaining the use of padlet (CLICK HERE) for the Q&A session, followed by an introduction of the presenters, our topic, the scope, and the goal of our panel presentation. Panelists will make initial comments about the overarching topic, the Importance of Digital Fabrication Engagement in HS PBL Environments, before answering the moderator's questions and questions submitted via padlet.


Speakers
avatar for Conner Bolen

Conner Bolen

Engineering Teacher, Durham Public Schools
avatar for Adam Davidson

Adam Davidson

Engineering Instructor, Riverside High School/Durham Public Schools
Adam W. Davidson teaches at Riverside high school in Durham, NC. He is an Ultimaker Pioneer and STEM in the Park's 2018 STEM Educator of the Year. He oversees the development of Riverside's engineering program's Fab Lab and is a lead staff member for Riverside's engineering program... Read More →
avatar for Carpenter, Haley

Carpenter, Haley

Student, Riverside High School
Haley Carpenter is a junior in a high school engineering program. She is proficient in 3D modeling, CAD, and 3D printing. Her passions include field hockey, prosthetics, and the outdoors. She hopes to merge her passions, and use her knowledge of 3D printing and modeling to create... Read More →
avatar for Kiyoko Takahashi

Kiyoko Takahashi

Student, Riverside High School
Kiyoko Takahashi, a junior in a high school engineering program, has become proficient in CAD, 3D modeling, and slicing software. She has learned to use industry standard fabrication tools including a CNC router, 3D printers, and a laser cutter/engraver. She helped plan an upcoming... Read More →
avatar for Glenn Walters

Glenn Walters

Director of the ESE Design Center, BeAM at UNC Chapel Hill
Glenn Walters is the director of the ESE Design Center at UNC Chapel Hill, a design and fabrication facility that specializes in development of unique tools and instrumentation for research.  He is also a founding member of the UNC BeAM Makerspace Executive Committee and the senior... Read More →


Sunday October 7, 2018 10:45am - 11:25am
Conference Room A

10:45am

Cuyahoga Community College Students Use 3D Printing to Help Veterans
Cuyahoga Community College students studying additive manufacturing technologies, design and 3D print affordable, assistive devices for Veterans as their Additive Manufacturing Capstone class project.  We wanted the students to have a meaningful experience that involved real-world problems.  All courses in the 3D Digital Design & Manufacturing Program that are project-based incorporate current problems/issues in the community.   For the Additive Manufacturing Capstone project, the students must utilize 3D printing to create their Capstone project.  Since 3D printing has such an impact in the medical industry, it would be most beneficial for the students to work with Veterans.  Among other things, 3D printing has the ability to design and manufacture patient specific devices.  The students work with the Veterans and create an assistive device that helps them to overcome their unique challenges.  For example given the ability to garden, throwing a ball or shaving without assistant.  Also, many of these devices can be printed for under ten dollars.  Implications of this project provide students with real-world, invaluable experience.  They learn how to use critical thinking and analytical skills to solve a problem that affects people community.  It also allows them to utilize their skills in reverse engineering, solid modeling and 3D printing.    

Speakers
avatar for Alethea V. Ganaway

Alethea V. Ganaway

Program Manager, Cuyahoga Community College
Alethea V. Ganaway has worked for Cuyahoga Community College (Tri-C), for seven years and an educator for over thirteen years.  Currently Ms. Ganaway is the Program Manager for the Additive Manufacturing and Ideation Station (a hi tech fab lab).  She has helped define the program's... Read More →


Sunday October 7, 2018 10:45am - 11:25am
Conference Room Eight

10:45am

Digital sculpting to 3D printing in University class
In Spring of 2018, I held my first 3D printing class at Clemson University Digital production art Major.
The class goal was to create a digital models, and reproduce them in to a 3D printed form.
We were able to produce more then ten piece of art work in a physical form and I will like to talk about the techniques and challenge we had during the course.

Speakers
avatar for Insun Kwon

Insun Kwon

Professor of Practice in Digital Production Arts, Clemson University



Sunday October 7, 2018 10:45am - 11:25am
Conference Room Four

10:45am

Everything Changes: How Duke University Tracks and Shares Evolving 3DP Designs using makeSEA
3D print and project collections evolve so rapidly that incremental improvements and critical knowledge can easily get lost in the shuffle. Join this session to learn how Duke University uses makeSEA to keep track of projects as they evolve and are matured, mashed-up, and repurposed by various makers over time. Duke.makesea.com is home to Duke's growing collection of 3D object designs that are comprised of evolving assets and supporting collateral, and provides Web-based access for public and private audiences. makeSEA serves as a system of record, provides change, lineage and attribution tracking, and project-wide version control with expandable metadata to catalog design collateral, materials and settings, print attributes, etc. Plus, comprehensive Web site content management tools and safe online community space for Duke team members to collaborate on project designs. makeSEA helps ensure that Duke and its makers have visibility, ownership and control of evolving intellectual property that keeps with university policies. This presentation will demonstrate how the features and workflow of duke.makesea.com provide easy-to-use tools to curate 3D projects. As well as how makeSEA team collaboration, version control, lineage and attribution tracking, and other makeSEA features provide safe harbor for student and Institution intellectual property on the Web.

Speakers
avatar for Chip Bobbert

Chip Bobbert

Digital Fabrication Architect, Duke University
Chip Bobbert is the Digital Fabrication Architect and manager of Duke University's four specialty labs--the Multimedia Project Studio and three CoLab Studio locations.  In this role, he has developed and built one of the largest 3D printing focused labs in higher education.  This... Read More →
avatar for Chris Stavros

Chris Stavros

Chief Maker, MakeSEA
Chris Stavros is an independent 3D object designer and Chief Maker at makeSEA. Chris has a deep background of experience building portals for K-20 education, Web-based workflow automation for digital lithography, and digital asset management and version control systems. He founded... Read More →


Sunday October 7, 2018 10:45am - 11:25am
Conference Room B

11:00am

Empowerment, Identity, and Personalized Pathways in Maker Education Crossroads 2018
Many of today's makerspaces see themselves as places for individuals to build anything they can imagine. Whether it's a child who wants to design her own fidget spinner or a college student who needs to prototype a class project, makerspaces allow the mind’s creativity to become reality.  This panel will unpack the inclusive goals of makerspaces and ask the question: Who's not here and why? Exploring issues of equity and access, the panelists will share their experiences of creating more inclusive spaces that address the important social issues of our time.

Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Darius McCoy

Darius McCoy

Youth Employment Program Manager, Digital Harbor Foundation
Darius is the 3D Printing Manager at the Digital Harbor Foundation where he founded 3D Assistance, a 3d printer repair service for educators throughout Baltimore and the new Print Shop, a youth-run 3d printing service. He leveraged his experience with 3D Printing to gain national... Read More →


Sunday October 7, 2018 11:00am - 12:00pm
Salon III

11:30am

3D printing for Rockets and Robots
3D printing is a key tool for the Brazoswood Career and Technical Education department, especially in our robotics and rocketry classes. Get an in-depth look at how our high school students are utilizing free CAD tools to design and print custom components for competition robots and student-built rockets. Our CTE department has purchased a industrial grade 3D printer, capable of printing composite continuous fiberglass, nylon, and carbon fiber filaments. The material properties of the prints produced allows our students to prototype and refine designs that can then be used in real-world applications. In addition to creating durable prints for use in robots and rockets, our robotics students built their own FDM printer farm by assembling five open source kit printers. These will support the STEM program and raise money through the sales of prints to students and teachers while also educating our campus and community about 3D printing technology and applications. The robotics students learned about the history of 3D printing and the RepRap movement. Students applied for specific roles, including management, marketing, and assembly. They then worked in their teams to assemble, calibrate, and deploy the five printers.

Speakers
avatar for Brad Whitehead

Brad Whitehead

Engineering Teacher, Brazoswood High School
Brad is a mechanical engineer who teaches high school engineering, robotics, and UAVs. He is passionate about bringing digital fabrication to the classroom.


Sunday October 7, 2018 11:30am - 12:10pm
Conference Room C

11:30am

Design for Rapid Prototyping: A Review of Design for Additive Manufacturing Literature for Applications in Makerspaces
Additive Manufacturing (AM), also known as 3D printing has transformed education at all levels of K-12 and higher education and 3D printers are increasingly accessible at any makerspace. While this new manufacturing process has democratized the process of design and innovation, there is tremendous hype surrounding its capabilities to transform an idea into a real product. The end product resulting from a 3D printer depends on several different factors, including the type of printer, materials and numerous process parameters. Designers and educators could benefit from accurate yet straightforward guidelines necessary to ensure that the part design is compatible with the intended additive manufacturing technique. The purpose of this paper is present relevant reported work towards the creation of design rules and guidelines for AM. These guidelines could be utilized by educators and practitioners of AM to gauge the suitability of their design for the specific AM process that would be accessible to them. Moreover, these guidelines could also assist the learner to modify their design to meet the functional requirements while also making it compatible with the AM process.

Speakers
avatar for J Auston Ferrarer

J Auston Ferrarer

Prototyping Instructor / Undergraduate Researcher, Georgia Institute of Technology
I am a 3rd year Mechanical Engineering student here at Georgia Tech; and I love designing and building projects that help make the world a better place. The first project team I was a part of worked on designing a self sustaining fuel source for people in Uttar Pradesh, India who... Read More →
avatar for Amit Jariwala

Amit Jariwala

Director of Design & Innovation, Georgia Institute of Technology
Dr. Jariwala serves as the Director of Design & innovation for the School of Mechanical Engineering at Georgia Tech and is responsible for enhancing corporate support for the School's design courses and innovation activities. He supervises staff and students for the Georgia Tech Invention... Read More →
TL

Thomas Lee Spencer

I am pursuing a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering (B.S. and M.S., Georgia Institute of Technology). My research lies at the intersection of fluid dynamics, mechatronics, and biology. For this research, 3D printing is essential to recreate the complex biological structures enabling animals... Read More →


Sunday October 7, 2018 11:30am - 12:10pm
Conference Room Eight

11:30am

The Tactile Education Project - digital fabrication for the education Visually Impaired children
We have five senses to choose from in daily life. Only a very small part of them are used in the educational context where we mostly focus on sight and hearing. When sight is taken away, the modalities students can choose from are very limited. For persons with VI, touch and sound are used to compensate, but what about in education? There are a lot of haptic materials available, but in practice they are of replaced for descriptions, which doesn't provide all the information. Thanks to digital fabrication we have the opportunity to easily create cheap one of a kind tactile models. For the last two years, I have been researching and developing tactile models for the education of VI. We have seen promising results but also a lot of enjoyment from the students when working with the models. We made over 40 models, but do they also improve their academic results? In this presentation, I would like to share the results on previous projects and our experiences. As well as the projects, we are currently working on: researching the impact of tactile information, accessible tactile maps, and creating guidelines for accessible tactile models.

Speakers
avatar for Brandsma, Ruben

Brandsma, Ruben

The Accessibility Foundation
Graduated a year ago at the Hogeschool Utrecht on Digitale Communicatie en Media and creative industry. While looking for an internship on serious games Ruben stumbled upon The Accessibility Foundation. Where the opportunity arose to write his thesis on 3D printing and the possibilities... Read More →


Sunday October 7, 2018 11:30am - 12:10pm
Conference Room Four

11:30am

Training The New Collar Workforce
Based upon interviews with 200 manufacturing executives on the skills needed for Industry 4.0., The New Collar Workforce study reports on today's job requirements.  The surprising results led directly back to the work being carried out in Fab Labs and makerspaces with recommendations for innovative training programs to prepare the New Collar Workforce for the jobs of both today and tomorrow.

Speakers
avatar for Sarah Boisvert

Sarah Boisvert

Staff, Fab Lab Hub
Sarah Boisvert has worked in Digital Fabrication including laser micro machining, 3D Printing and CAD design for over 30 years.  She co-founded the commercial division of Potomac Photonics, Inc. which built excimer lasers and laser machine tools for the medical device, biotech and... Read More →


Sunday October 7, 2018 11:30am - 12:10pm
Conference Room B

12:30pm

Trotec - Grasshopper Workshop with Andres Gonzalez
A Trotec workshop with Andres Gonzalez.

Speakers
AG

Andres Gonzalez

McNeel
Andrés is a software trainer and developer since the 1980s. He has developed applications for diverse design markets as well as training materials for different CAD and Design software including the community of training materials www.rhino3d.tvAndrés has been working with the... Read More →


Sunday October 7, 2018 12:30pm - 1:10pm
Conference Room D

1:15pm

Flexible, 3D-printed, Meso-scale Robotic Systems for Surgical Interventions
This talk will focus specifically on our recent advances in image-guided robot-assisted neurosurgery, in two specific project areas: a) MINIR: Minimally Invasive Neurosurgical Intracranial Robot and b) Neurosurgical Intracerebral Hemorrhage Evacuation (NICHE) robot. The talk will discuss the robot design, 3D-printing, as well as our experimental results.

Speakers
avatar for Jaydev Desai

Jaydev Desai

Georgia Institute of Technology
Dr. Jaydev P. Desai is currently a Professor in the Department of Biomedical Engineering at Georgia Institute of Technology and Director of RoboMed Laboratory. Prior to joining UMCP, he was an Associate Professor at Drexel University. He completed his undergraduate studies from the... Read More →


Sunday October 7, 2018 1:15pm - 1:55pm
Salon III

1:15pm

Getting Involved in Youth Entrepreneurship with Digital Fabrication
In this session, I will be sharing my experiences on managing a youth entrepreneurship program. I manage the 3D Print Shop, a youth-run 3D printing service. The goal is to provide youth the opportunity to learn technical and universal employment skills through digital fabrication for clients.

Speakers
avatar for Darius McCoy

Darius McCoy

Youth Employment Program Manager, Digital Harbor Foundation
Darius is the 3D Printing Manager at the Digital Harbor Foundation where he founded 3D Assistance, a 3d printer repair service for educators throughout Baltimore and the new Print Shop, a youth-run 3d printing service. He leveraged his experience with 3D Printing to gain national... Read More →


Sunday October 7, 2018 1:15pm - 1:55pm
Conference Room Four

1:15pm

Impacting Product Development Through Additive Manufacturing
Caterpillar has invested in additive manufacturing to meet the demanding challenges of the markets we serve. However, application of additive is not without its challenges, which include cost of an additive part vs. tradition manufacturing as well as validation of a part manufactured in anew method. In this presentation, we will share this journey and look at a few case studies, in both metal and non-metallic, of how we overcome the challenges and are using additive manufacturing to positively impact our business by supporting product development to
* Enable rapid exploration of new concepts and design changes without investment in expensive tooling
* Enable product development teams to get engineering data and customer feedback early in the development cycle in a manner that is cost effective
* Identify cost effective ways to support our customers and products n the field.
Learning Objectives:
Upon completion, participants will be able to 
* Better seek out and identify opportunities where additive manufacturing can be applied to the product development process and the product support process
* Understand how to apply additive manufacturing in a cost effective manner.

Speakers
avatar for Stacey DelVecchio

Stacey DelVecchio

Additive Manufacturing Product Manager, Caterpillar Inc.
Stacey DelVecchio is the Additive Manufacturing Product Manager for Caterpillar where she leverages 3D printing in new product introduction, supply chain, and operations and manages their Additive Manufacturing Factory. She has been at Caterpillar for 29 years and holds a B.S. in... Read More →


Sunday October 7, 2018 1:15pm - 1:55pm
Conference Room B

1:15pm

Ring Design and Silver Casting Project for High School CAD & Chemistry Students
This talk will describe a cross-curricular design project involving the design of a ring to be worn on one's finger in a CAD class, the 3D printing of that design using ABS polymer, and the casting of the ring out of Sterling silver using a lost-wax casting technique carried out by sophomore high school students in the Olathe Engineering Academy. The Olathe Engineering Academy is a career-exploration program that is imbedded within Olathe Northwest High School, a public suburban high school outside of Kansas City, KS. This design project seeks to build students' ability to design a personalized ring which adheres to design constraints (such as maximum and minimum thicknesses on all possible dimensions) and produce a high-quality finished ring in light of the limitations and challenges of the casting and finishing processes available when working with Sterling silver. This project concludes with a student reflection activity focusing on students providing specific ways they could improve their finished ring by adjusting their original CAD design to better account for the limitations of the ring's manufacturing process. A link will be provided to an online folder with student and teacher materials for the project.

Speakers
avatar for Bruce Wellman

Bruce Wellman

Chemistry & Engineering Teacher, Olathe Engineering Academy, Olathe Northwest High School
Bruce Wellman (NBCT, Chemistry) currently teaches chemistry, engineering and robotics as part of the Engineering Academy at Olathe Northwest High School in Olathe, Kansas. Wellman has organized and led small- and large-scale professional development for STEM teachers and has been... Read More →


Sunday October 7, 2018 1:15pm - 1:55pm
Conference Room C

1:15pm

Making Strong Functional 3D Prints
Last year at Construct3D I presented on printing functional and strong parts. After the presentation I was asked a lot of follow up questions on materials, designs, and more.

This year I want to offer a workshop on the topic of printing strong functional parts. In the workshop I will lead the group through gaining an understanding of material properties, general print settings that will impact part strength, part design changes for strength, generative design, tolerancing, fastening, and material applications with tips on printing.

Projected Outline for Presentation

General design principles
Geometry and its impact on strength
Moment of Inertia

General material properties
Define, Explain, and Examples of
Rigidity
Toughness
Layer adhesion

More specific material properties
Materials information and resources
Amorphous and crystalline structures
Define, Explain, and Examples of
Flexural Strength
Tensile Stress
Heat Deflection Temperature
Impact
Material Safety and Data Sheets (MSDS)
Technical Data Sheets (TDS)

Failures of parts
Bending
Tension
Compression
Crack propagation

Designing for strength
Direct Modeling

Design choices planning for 3D printing
Fasteners/adhesives/fits

Print settings for strength
Research driven information on infill types and percentages
Impact of layer choices, temperatures, etc.

Closing
Resources
Q & A


Speakers
avatar for Alex Larson

Alex Larson

Applied Technology Teacher, Palatine High School
Alex is an Applied Technology Teacher who has been teaching 3D printing and CNC machining in the classroom for 13 years. He currently teaches manufacturing, engineering, and research courses.


Sunday October 7, 2018 1:15pm - 2:40pm
Conference Room Eight

2:00pm

Student Panel on 3D Printing and CAD in High School Robotics
Two students discuss their experience learning to design robot parts at our high school. They will show the projects they have been working on, one an underwater robot completely designed and printed by the student for a class challenge, and the other a hover craft modeled by the student. Students will answer questions about how engineering and 3D printing have opened doors for them both as an educational opportunity, as career training, and as a creative outlet. Come ask questions and see first hand how students are using 3D printing to augment the STEM programs at Tillamook High School.

Speakers
MR

Mark Roberts

Instructor, Tillamook High School
Mark finished his undergraduate studies with the intention of becoming a zookeeper. After several years of working in zoos, he earned his masters in teaching and began working in public education. Now he finds himself teaching electronics, programming, robotics, woodshop, engineering... Read More →


Sunday October 7, 2018 2:00pm - 2:40pm
Conference Room Four

2:00pm

Digital Fabrication, Need Knowers, and Multidisciplinary Teams - A New Way of Educating
The classroom provides a unique opportunity for longer-term learning, collaboration, relationship building, and project development. By integrating making skills and needs-based design thinking into all levels of education (K-12, Academia, informal education) we’re expanding how students’ solve problems, increasing their empathy and understanding of how different populations live, and giving real-world challenges to tackle. The session will share several case studies where students worked directly with need knowers and needs institutions to solve challenges as part of their curriculum and how this can be expanded and scaled-up.

Speakers
avatar for Michal Kabatznik

Michal Kabatznik

Co-Founder, Milestone Studio Labs
I'm passionate about harnessing technology to solve the world's greatest unmet challenges. I think that we don't need to reinvent the wheel but rather need to examine new, fresh uses for existing technologies. In our world of innovation, no need should be unmet!
avatar for Oded Shorer

Oded Shorer

Founder, Milestone Studio Labs
Oded Shorer is a multidisciplinary designer, educator, and entrepreneur with more than 15 years of experience turning strong ideas into tangible products and solutions.  He is the founder of Milestone Studio Labs, a social impact innovation consulting firm that works closely with... Read More →


Sunday October 7, 2018 2:00pm - 2:40pm
Conference Room A

2:00pm

Mobile MakerSpace: Reaching virtual students through mobile 3D printing
In 2017, Georgia Connections Academy, a virtual charter school, developed a Mobile MakerSpace - a traveling MakerSpace made up of five 3D printers and five 3D pens - designed so teachers could take this technology to students who are located around the state of Georgia.  This session will detail how we built our traveling MakerSpace, how we use it with our students,  what we do to ensure all students gain access to this technology, and what we have learned in the process.  We will share designs our students have made as well as how they collaborate virtually to design and print their models.

Speakers
avatar for Wendy Aracich

Wendy Aracich

Lead High School Media Arts Teacher, Georgia Connections Academy
Wendy Aracich teaches media arts at Georgia Connections Academy, a public online charter school serving students throughout the state of Georgia. Wendy has developed a Mobile MakerSpace to ensure that virtual students have access to the same technology as their peers. Passionate about... Read More →


Sunday October 7, 2018 2:00pm - 2:40pm
Conference Room Eight

2:00pm

Using AR to augment STEM education
The talk will present the results of a multi-year participatory design process exploring the space of educational AR experiences for STEM education targeted at students of various ages and abilities. Our participants included teachers, students (ages five to fourteen), educational technology experts, game designers, and HCI (Human Computer Interface) researchers. The work was informed by state educational curriculum guidelines. The activities included developing a set of design dimensions which guided our ideation process, iteratively designing, building, and evaluating six prototypes with our stakeholders, and collecting our observations regarding the use of AR STEM applications by target students.

Speakers
avatar for Amy Lambeth

Amy Lambeth

UX researcher, Georgia Tech
Amy Lambeth is a UX researcher at Georgia Tech's Interactive Media Technology Center (IMTC) who operates at the intersection of people and technology. She applies user-centered design principles to applications in augmented reality, gaming, wearable technology, accessibility, and... Read More →


Sunday October 7, 2018 2:00pm - 2:40pm
Salon III

2:00pm

Wearable objects as a means to engage k-6 students in creating functional designs
Teaching 3d design through the creation of functional objects intended for a specific purpose is  a both an effective and engaging means to give students the tools and knowledge to practically use their 3d design skills.  But that approach can be lost on a younger audience who certainly have the skills to design relatively complex models but may lack the focus to make something functional considering many functional objects just aren’t that exciting to them.  After trying different approaches to solve this gap wearable 3d printed objects have risen to the top as the most successful way to engage K-6th grade students in creating designs for an explicit purpose.  I’ll be sharing what my team has learned and the outcomes we’ve had exploring this approach to teaching design for 3d printing.

Speakers
avatar for Ryan Bell

Ryan Bell

Maker Specialist, Maker Studio at Science City
Ryan Bell is the Maker Specialist at the Maker Studio at Science City, where she puts both her Bachelors of Fine Arts degree and 14 years of classroom experience to work developing curriculum in 3d printing, sewing, electronics, printmaking and many other making areas. She is also... Read More →


Sunday October 7, 2018 2:00pm - 2:40pm
Conference Room C

2:45pm

Educational Instruction in a Makerspace: dealing with varying skill levels
Speakers
avatar for Sara Gonzalez

Sara Gonzalez

Science Librarian, University of Florida
Sara Gonzalez is the Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Visualization Librarian at the Marston Science Library at the University of Florida. A former geophysicist, her research interests include emerging technologies in libraries, modeling and visualization of data, and scientific... Read More →
avatar for Amit Jariwala

Amit Jariwala

Director of Design & Innovation, Georgia Institute of Technology
Dr. Jariwala serves as the Director of Design & innovation for the School of Mechanical Engineering at Georgia Tech and is responsible for enhancing corporate support for the School's design courses and innovation activities. He supervises staff and students for the Georgia Tech Invention... Read More →
avatar for Payson McNett

Payson McNett

Studio Art instructor and director of Visual, Applied and Performing Arts Fab Lab and Campus Makerspace programs, Cabrillo College
BA San Jose State University, MFA Indiana University, Studio Art instructor and director of  Visual, Applied and Performing Arts Fab Lab and Campus Makerspace programs at Cabrillo College in Aptos California.
avatar for Sophia T. Santillan

Sophia T. Santillan

Assistant Professor of the Practice in the Duke Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science Department., Duke University
Sophia, is an Assistant Professor of the Practice in the Duke Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science Department. After earning her Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering she joined the faculty at the United States Naval Academy, teaching courses in engineering fundamentals and machine... Read More →


Sunday October 7, 2018 2:45pm - 3:25pm
Conference Room A

2:45pm

An Educational Framework to Increase Proficiency in 3D Printing Education
This session presents an educational framework for teaching 3D printing that focuses on developing student proficiency. This framework is based in Bloom's Taxonomy and differentiates instruction between operation and technique. By considering these educational models, the framework allows for the design or selection of assignments that can be used to teach 3D printing at beginner, intermediate, and expert level proficiencies from elementary through university level. Practically, this framework exists as a table that organizes current and potential 3D printing activities on a continuum of increasing proficiency, and instructors can pick and choose which ones to use in their classrooms. To provide perspective, several current methods of teaching 3D printing proficiency will be discussed and contextualized with respect to the framework. This framework has been applied in a prototyping class where students started with a range of proficiencies. Assessment of the use of this framework demonstrated that students were able to increase their proficiency in the observed assignments.

Speakers
avatar for Matthew Wettergreen

Matthew Wettergreen

lecturer, Rice University
Matthew Wettergreen received his Ph.D. from Rice University in Bioengineering with a focus on 3D printing and the design of bone repair scaffolds. After receiving his Ph.D. Matthew went on to found Caroline Collective, Houston's first coworking space. In 2011 Matthew began as a lecturer... Read More →


Sunday October 7, 2018 2:45pm - 3:25pm
Conference Room Eight

2:45pm

CAD/ CAM in a High School Robotics Program
I teach a class where students learn to use Rhino software and SolidWorks in order to make stickers, t-shirts, and 3D models for use with 3D printers. The idea is that students get to experience a variety of software packages, and CAM machines, build a 3d printer kit, and go through the process of engineering from idea to prototype product. We do fundraising by making stickers and apparel within the school, as well as 3D parts for land, underwater, and aerial robotics. I would present on how my teaching career progressed from a 1 trimester class into a full time robotics program over 2 years, and how 3D printing has been a part of that. I would share a couple of projects that students have completed, and talk about why this technology is relevant for students seeking relevant job skills.

Speakers
MR

Mark Roberts

Instructor, Tillamook High School
Mark finished his undergraduate studies with the intention of becoming a zookeeper. After several years of working in zoos, he earned his masters in teaching and began working in public education. Now he finds himself teaching electronics, programming, robotics, woodshop, engineering... Read More →


Sunday October 7, 2018 2:45pm - 3:25pm
Conference Room C

2:45pm

Is That Thing On Fire?? Design and construction of the SketchUp Arcade Machine.
Join digital fabrication wizard Eric Shimelpfenig as he recounts the design and construction of the SketchUp Arcade machine. In this session he will divulge how SketchUp can be used in the classroom to empower design thinking and help students develop scalable design skills. You will also learn the SketchUp tips and tricks that enable the fabrication workflows employed in this project. 


Speakers
avatar for Eric Shimelpfenig

Eric Shimelpfenig

SketchUp
Eric started his career designing architectural millwork, furniture and cabinetry. After many years working for wood shops and cabinetry showrooms he founded SketchThis.net with the goal of making it easier for designers to use technology in their businesses. He has worked with Google... Read More →


Sunday October 7, 2018 2:45pm - 3:25pm
Salon III

2:45pm

STE(A)M Truck- a possible solution for increasing access to opportunity
Can an innovation lab on wheels disrupt and transform public education? The maker movement is increasingly mentioned as an effective way to encourage youth to innovate and learn 21st century skills. The concern is that access to technologies, like 3D printers, may accelerate the opportunity divides. STE(A)M Truck, a growing fleet of mobile makerspaces hopes to eliminate inequities too often predicted by zip code. This session will showcase success, failures, and lessons learned while providing an overview of the Maker Movement in the K-12 space as a growing trend to eliminate inequities and transform teaching and learning.

Speakers
avatar for Jason Martin

Jason Martin

Jason Martin founded Community Guilds Inc. in 2013 to transform public education. Through their work, kids tackle real problems, design solutions, get their hands dirty, and then, with community experts, build amazing innovations together. Community Guilds harnesses the power of the... Read More →


Sunday October 7, 2018 2:45pm - 3:25pm
Conference Room Four

2:45pm

The Surrounding Planet Rematerialized
Emerging technology is bringing greater opportunities for artists who are seeking new ways to communicate to large and diverse audiences. In my work, 3D computer generated and digital modeling, 3D scanning, 3D printing, 3D modeling from CT scans, augmented and virtual reality technology are used to rematerialize actual live plants from their outer forms to their inner layers from the cellular level. Through the documentation and heightened awareness of the significant plants from around the world, I hope to promote the protection of the natural surroundings. As humankind draws toward technology and instant gratification, it pulls away from the natural world, draining resources in the name of "advancement" and resulting in potential devastation in the form of climate change. Because of 3D technology, an engaging and immersive experience to see the intriguing characteristics of ecosystems draws attention back to nature. Seeing the plants natural engineered features through technology such as 3D printing encourages viewers to come engage with and ultimately seek to protect the environment. This paper will cover the research and various opportunities that showcased my work as a blend of science and art and the impressive state of the art 3D technology that helped make it happen.

Speakers
avatar for Darlene Farris-LaBar

Darlene Farris-LaBar

Professor of Art + Design, East Stroudsburg University
Darlene Farris-LaBar, a Professor of Art + Design at East Stroudsburg University, received her MFA in Sculpture at SUNY, Purchase College, a BFA in Sculpture from Indiana University of Pennsylvania, and an AAS in Digital Media Arts from College of Technology of NYC. Her art requires... Read More →


Sunday October 7, 2018 2:45pm - 3:25pm
Conference Room B

3:30pm

Sunday Afternoon Coffee Break
Sunday October 7, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Georgia Tech Hotel 800 Spring St NW, Atlanta, GA 30308

4:00pm

3D - Printing: An Advantage for High School Research
Experimental research often needs the capability to fabricate small parts to complete apparatus for building experimental setups, more so in the case of research centered around engineering problems. Traditionally researchers depended on metal and wood working shops and other fabrication units to perform these tasks. Such facilities are rare within the school for k-12 research students. Young researchers require multiple iterations of design before they successfully assemble a workable experimental set up for their research. This becomes a costly and time-consuming exercise since it involves negotiations between students and mentors - who are novices in fabrication -and professional fabricators who find small specialized research fabrication needs not worth their time. The paradigm shift in fabrication and prototyping generated by 3D printing has significantly mitigated these hurdles since the students and mentors can design the components using freely available design software and print them at their convenience. The researchers can afford to put their design through multiple iterations and assemble a practical experimental setup. Currently there are materials available with varied properties for 3D- printing and the printers can also be modified for extrusion of pastes using 3D-printed parts. Moreover, these are affordable for k-12 research facilities.

I have been mentoring K-12 research in Engineering for the past 9 years and have done in occasionally on need basis in Physics while I taught in UAE for eight years. Using a grant funded by Orbital ATK, I introduced 3D-printing into the lab in 2012. This lead to a series of projects that used 3D-priting in prototyping for engineering research, biomechanics research, and fabricating components for experimental setups across different research labs in the school. The lab also pursues research in studying mechanical and electrical properties of 3D-printed products. 3D-printing has made our engineering research students expand the scope of international collaborative research with students form Daegu Science High School, South Korea and Hwa Chong High School, Singapore. Currently a fully functioning Digital Fabrication Club has originated out of this 3D-printing culture established by the lab. The digital fabrication experience, help the research students acquire skills in designing, fabrication, and rapid prototyping which has opened a number of opportunities to earn internships both during their high school years and after graduating from high school.Four of our students from out lab had presented their research in Construct3D 2017 and I myself have presented how to introduce 3D-printing in K-12 environment in collaboration with Josh Ajima in Construct3D 2017.

In Construct3D I will be using the Pecha Kucha Slide Show to bring out the significance of 3D-printing in making k-12 science and engineering research an accessible opportunity due to the paradigm shift it has generated in fabrication and prototyping.


Speakers
avatar for Sundaram Thirukkurungudi

Sundaram Thirukkurungudi

LCPS Academy of Science
A K-12 STEM teacher with 37 years of cumulative experience in education, training, and research in three different countries. An experimental and Theoretical Physicist by training but found his niche in the field of education which gives opportunities to excite young minds with the... Read More →


Sunday October 7, 2018 4:00pm - 4:00pm
Salon I, II, III

4:00pm

Expressive Materials and 3D Printing In Art Classrooms
In this fast-paced slideshow, presenter will provide a visual overview of projects being produced in a makerspace/art classroom using 3D printing technology with a special focus on materials, process, and aesthetics. Examples include, 3D Doodler Relief Drawings, PLA Painting, Turtle Art Melts, 3D Puzzles, 3D Printed Sculpture Stacks, and a variety surface treatments for 3D printed forms.

Speakers
avatar for Erin Riley

Erin Riley

Director, E+D Lab, Greenwich Academy


Sunday October 7, 2018 4:00pm - 4:45pm
Salon I, II, III

4:00pm

Making for Health Sciences Education and Research
This talk will highlight the use cases, instructional programs, and outreach efforts of a pioneering makerspace in an academic health sciences library.

3D printing and other emerging technologies have enabled many innovations and breakthroughs in medicine, life sciences, and healthcare. However, many academic libraries still lack sufficient support, educational opportunities, and maker programs that are tailored for the needs of students, faculty, and researchers in the areas of medicine, life sciences, and healthcare. This Ignite Talk will focus on the Innovation Space, a makerspace specifically created to support innovative teaching, learning, and research activities in these areas. The Innovation Space is operated by the University of Maryland, Baltimore's Health Sciences and Human Services Library that serves both a teaching hospital and graduate programs in medicine, dentistry, nursing, pharmacy, social work, and life sciences.


Speakers
avatar for Brian Zelip

Brian Zelip

Emerging Technologies Librarian, University of Maryland, Baltimore
Brian Zelip is the Emerging Technologies Librarian at the University of Maryland, Baltimore. He runs the Health Sciences and Human Services Library's maker space where he collaborates with users to bring ideas to life and leverage emerging technologies in education and research. He... Read More →


Sunday October 7, 2018 4:00pm - 4:45pm
Salon I, II, III

4:00pm

Measure, Cut, Code: 3D printing activities with Middle School Students
As an art teacher who integrates 3D printing into traditional studio classes, I am particularly keen on combining hands-on instruction in design and the fine arts with an introduction to fundamental concepts in Programming and Computer Science. This presentation will showcase original projects that have successfully engaged Middle-School students in after-school and Summer programs at The Brearley School, using simple tools ranging from rulers, razors, and corrugated cardboard - to the free web-based 3D printing programming language BlockSCAD. 3D printed maze games and a Greek-inspired temple using custom-designed LEGO-compatible blocks will be the highlights.

Speakers
avatar for Luigi Cicala

Luigi Cicala

2018 will mark my sixteenth year teaching Studio Art at The Brearley School, and my third as Director of The CoLaboratory - Brearley’s MakerSpace program. I use technologies inspired by the “Maker Movement” - like 3D printing - to create new curriculum and enhance existing pedagogy... Read More →


Sunday October 7, 2018 4:00pm - 4:45pm
Salon I, II, III

4:50pm

Tinkercad: Present, Future, and Beyond
Join us to hear about all the exciting new features in Tinkercad.
Learn about where Tinkercad is headed, why it matters, and how
Tinkercad is lighting the path to the future.

Speakers
avatar for Guillermo Melantoni

Guillermo Melantoni

Senior Product Line Manager: Tinkercad & Fusion 360 at Autodesk, Autodesk
Guillermo Melantoni has a degree in architecture, has worked as a design professor at state and private architecture schools, and was also a consultant for architectural firms. In 2006 Autodesk, Inc., hired him to became an application engineer, doing demos and pilots involving the... Read More →


Sunday October 7, 2018 4:50pm - 5:20pm
Salon I, II, III

5:25pm

Closing Remarks
Sunday October 7, 2018 5:25pm - 5:45pm
Salon I, II, III
 
Monday, October 8
 

9:00am

Tinkercad Codeblocks: Code for CAD
Limited Capacity filling up

Already using Scratch blocks? Time to take coding in a new direction.
Bring your CODE to life with Tinkercad and 3D printing.

Speakers
avatar for John Helfen

John Helfen

Technical Product Manager - Tinkercad Platform at Autodesk, Autodesk
By day I am Product Manager for both Tinkercad and Fusion. I have been with Autodesk for nearly 20 years in roles ranging from Product Support to Product Management focused on Manufacturing, Architecture, and Education. By night I am a maker, builder, teacher, husband, and parent... Read More →


Monday October 8, 2018 9:00am - 10:25am
Love #185

9:00am

Custom Mold Making Through 3D Printing
Limited Capacity filling up

Ever wondered how to safely add concepts of casting and mold making to your curriculum?  This workshop will show you how to make silicone molds and casts from those molds using one of the lowest risk materials out there: soap!  Pick from an array of 3D printed objects and learn how to turn those into fun, colorful bars of soap!


Speakers
avatar for John Hinkel

John Hinkel

While attending graduate school at Georgia Tech, John served as a 3D Print Master for the Invention Studio (one of several people in charge of the 3D printing space at the studio).  After graduate school, John works as a developer during the day, but continues to find innovative... Read More →


Monday October 8, 2018 9:00am - 12:00pm
Love Bldg #210

9:00am

Graphical Scripting with Grasshopper using the SudoHopper3D card game method
Limited Capacity seats available

Andrés González of McNeel Miami will introduce rapid and solid techniques for teaching or learning Grasshopper for you or your students using SudoHopper3D.
SudoHopper3D is a card game to improve the overall understanding of parametric thinking in Grasshopper.

In this workshop, students will learn, in a playfully manner, some basic mathematics, algorithms and basic visual coding.

Each participant will receive a full, one-year subscription to learn the material to understand and solve the 32 assignments in the game.

Speakers
AG

Andres Gonzalez

McNeel
Andrés is a software trainer and developer since the 1980s. He has developed applications for diverse design markets as well as training materials for different CAD and Design software including the community of training materials www.rhino3d.tvAndrés has been working with the... Read More →


Monday October 8, 2018 9:00am - 12:00pm
Love #183

9:00am

Intro to CAD: 3D Modeling with OnShape
Limited Capacity seats available

I have noticed a trend. Many students who first come in contact with a 3D printer have nothing to print, or at best they download files from thingiverse and print parts that other people have designed. This is usually because they don't have the tools or knowledge to make their own ideas come to life. We are here to change that! A high school instructor and 2 high school students will lead participants through a 3 hour intro to CAD workshop. Participants will learn the basics of 3D modeling design, as well as pointers for how to design a model for FDM 3D printing. The software platform for the session will be free OnShape CAD software, and the students will guide participants through the design and build of an example project before facilitating a creative design session where each member creates something on their own. Participants will leave with a file that could be sliced and printed on any 3D printer, as well as the basic knowledge to continue designing at home. They will also be competent in spreading their own knowledge to students and adults back home.

Speakers
MR

Mark Roberts

Instructor, Tillamook High School
Mark finished his undergraduate studies with the intention of becoming a zookeeper. After several years of working in zoos, he earned his masters in teaching and began working in public education. Now he finds himself teaching electronics, programming, robotics, woodshop, engineering... Read More →


Monday October 8, 2018 9:00am - 12:00pm
MRDC #4211

9:30am

Copolyester Filaments aren’t limited to PETG! Copolyesters Demystified – How to Select, Print and Succeed with Copolyester Printing
Copolyester-based filaments are well-known for making strong, good-looking parts with no printing odor.  In this workshop, we will discuss the benefits copolyesters, and teach the basics of printing with several different types of copolyester filaments – highlighting general all-around use, high temperature, flexible, carbon fiber-filled and rapid printing materials.

Speakers
avatar for Steve Wright

Steve Wright

Technology Fellow, Eastman Chemical Company
Dr. Steve Wright is a Technology Fellow at Eastman Chemical Company.   An Analytical Chemist by training, Steve guides Eastman’s efforts to discover and market new 3D printing materials for both filament extrusion (FFF/FDM) and laser/high speed sintering powder areas.   An avid... Read More →


Monday October 8, 2018 9:30am - 11:00am
MRDC #2404

10:00am

Sign up for a tour of Georgia Tech Makerspaces
Student led tours start at the beginning of each hour. There are three tour stops:
  1. Invention studio
  2. MILL - Materials Innovation and Learning Laboratory
  3. ECE Makerspace - Interdisciplinary Design Commons Each tour stop will take approximately 40 minutes and the commute across each stop is around 10 minutes.  Please do not sign up for different locations at the same time slot.
Please use this link to sign up for a spot!

Monday October 8, 2018 10:00am - 2:00pm
The Invention Studio 801 Ferst Dr, Atlanta, GA 30332

10:30am

Tinkercad to Fusion: Extend your designs
Limited Capacity filling up

Extend your Tinkercad designs by sending them directly into Fusion 360
as solid models. That’s right – native Tinkercad designs extendable with
Fusion 360 workflows!

Speakers
avatar for John Helfen

John Helfen

Technical Product Manager - Tinkercad Platform at Autodesk, Autodesk
By day I am Product Manager for both Tinkercad and Fusion. I have been with Autodesk for nearly 20 years in roles ranging from Product Support to Product Management focused on Manufacturing, Architecture, and Education. By night I am a maker, builder, teacher, husband, and parent... Read More →


Monday October 8, 2018 10:30am - 12:00pm
Love #185

1:00pm

Using Mathematica for 3D Printing
Limited Capacity seats available

Many academics use Mathematica as a primary design tool for 3D figures and graphics. These designs are often very valuable for their illustrative purposes as physical 3D objects — not just as renders on the screen. In recent years, Mathematica has starting building 3D printing formats into it’s repertoire. However, some designers still miss the control offered by traditional CAD programs. This workshop will be a hands-on approach designing and exporting 3D printing-ready designs. We will learn about the native Mathematica 3D graphics format and how to access graphical data from within 3D objects. This will enable us to write scripts to control every aspect of the 3D mesh and, therefore, the 3D print. We will learn to create STLs and write our own OBJs. Please come prepared with Mathematica installed on your laptop.

Speakers
avatar for Sabetta Matsumoto

Sabetta Matsumoto

Assistant Professor, Georgia Tech
Elisabetta Matsumoto is an assistant professor in the School of Physics at Georgia Institute of Technology. Her physics research centers around the relationship between geometry and material properties in soft systems, including liquid crystals, 3D printing and textiles. She is also... Read More →


Monday October 8, 2018 1:00pm - 2:30pm
MRDC #4211

1:00pm

Fusion 360 (with Sketchbook)
Limited Capacity filling up

As an Industrial Designer for 20 plus years and an adjunct faculty member in ID for 8 years, I believe in visual communication.  Using your hand to sketch out forms, ideas and concepts is the core to productive development and exploration.  At the same time, I have a deep understanding of the power of 3D CAD modeling.  Come explore what happens when you pull together Sketching and 3D Modeling.  I will be using Sketchbook and Fusion 360 to showcase the synergistic relationship these two tool sets have.

Speakers
avatar for Jeff Smith

Jeff Smith

Autodesk
Jeff Smith, IDSA, is an industrial designer currently working for Autodesk as an Education Manager.  With a diverse background in product design and development, Smith brings this experience to a team that supports Fusion360 in higher education within the United States. Prior to... Read More →


Monday October 8, 2018 1:00pm - 4:00pm
Love 109
 


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